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numerous environments when coupled with locally specialized body patterns. Keywords : Crotalus viridis , Viperidae, foraging behavior, habitat selection, geographical variation, snake ecology, evolution. Introduction Foraging behavior is believed to be of primary importance in the origin and radiation of

In: Behaviour

. In: Snakes: Ecology and Conservation Biology , p.  201 - 220 . Mullin S.J. Seigel R.A. , Eds, Cornell University Press , Ithaca . Laver P. Kelly M. ( 2008 ): A critical review of home range studies . J. Wildl. Manage. 72 : 290 - 298 . Manly B

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In: Amphibia-Reptilia

Despite the growing trends in quantitative field studies on tropical snake assemblages around the world, Asian tropical snake assemblages have remained less profoundly studied. A snake assemblage in an altered tropical forest-plantation mosaic in Bangladesh was studied for six months. Data were collected on the species composition and their relative frequency of occurrence. On the basis of these data, some major patterns highlighted by earlier studies on tropical snake ecology were tested. More specifically, we tested, the existence of: (1) non-random habitat niche partitioning, (2) the energetic equivalence rule, and (3) different mean body sizes among snake guilds, with distinctly smaller body sizes being expected among the subterranean species. A total of 374 specimens belonging to 34 different species were collected. High mean habitat niche overlap among species was observed, and there was no apparent non-random niche partitioning by snakes either considering all species together or dividing them by guild. The ‘energetic equivalence rule’ was verified, with larger species being less abundant than smaller species. Body sizes differed significantly across species’ habits, with subterranean species being not only significantly smaller but also revealing the least interspecific variation, and terrestrial/arboreal species showing the greatest interspecific variation. Overall, tropical Asian snake assemblages seem to be similar to tropical African snake assemblages in terms of their general organization.

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In: Amphibia-Reptilia

: Investigations of locomotor capacity as a model system. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 32: 367-396. Peterson, C.R., Gibson, A.R., Dorcas, M.E. 1993. Snake thermal ecology: the causes and consequences of body-temperature variation. In: Seigel, R.A., Collins, J.T., eds. Snakes: ecology and behaviour. McGraw

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

of free-ranging garter snakes Ecology 1987 68 160 169 Pianka E.R. Pianka H.D. Comparative ecology of twelve species of nocturnal lizards (Gekkonidae) in the Western Australian desert Copeia 1976 1976 125 142 Regal P.J. Voluntary hypothermia in reptiles Science 1967 155 1551 1553

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

.T., and Novak, S.S., eds. Snakes, ecology and evolutionary biology. Macmillan, New York, pp. 396– 421. Hughes, B. 1983. African snake faunas. Bonner Zool. Beitr. 34: 311–356. Madsen, T., Shine, R., Loman, J. and Hakansson, T. 1993. Determinants of mating success in male adders, Vipera berus

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

318 Naulleau, G. (1979): Etude biotélémetrique de la thermorégulation chez Vipera aspis (L.) elevée on conditions artificielles. J. Herpetol. 13: 203-208. Reinert, H.K. (1993): Habitat selection in snakes. In: Snakes. Ecology and Behavior, p. 201-240. Seigel, R.A., Collins, J.T., Eds, New York

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In: Amphibia-Reptilia

): Life history patterns in squamate reptiles. In: Biology of the Reptilia 16, Ecology B, p. 444-522. Gans, C., Huey, R.B., Eds., New York, Liss. Duvall, D., Schuett, G.W., Arnold, S.J. (1993): Ecology of snake mating systems. In: Snakes, Ecology and Behavior, p. 165-200. Seigel, R.A., Collins, J.T., Eds

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In: Amphibia-Reptilia
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, S.J. (1993): Foraging theory and prey size-predator size relations in snakes. In: Snakes: Ecology and Behav- ior, p. 87-115. Seigel, R.A., Collins, J.T., Eds, McGraw- Hill, New York. Cogger, H. (2000): Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia, 6th Edition. Reed New Holland, Sydney. Elgee, K., Blouin

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In: Amphibia-Reptilia
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good graphics and tables) aspects of snake ecology and demography with aspects of people’s demography, and shows how human behaviours may influence the likelihood of be- ing bitten in various parts of the world and under different environmental and habitat conditions. This introductory section to snake

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In: Amphibia-Reptilia