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Sigurdur Snorrason, Hrefna Sigurjónsdóttir, Anna Thórhallsdóttir and Machteld van Dierendonck

SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS IN A GROUP OF HORSES WITHOUT A MATURE STALLION by HREFNA SIGURJÓNSDÓTTIR 1) , MACHTELD C. VAN DIERENDONCK 2) , SIGURDUR SNORRASON 3) and ANNA G. THÓRHALLSDÓTTIR 4,5) ( 1 Iceland University of Education, Stakkahlid, 105 Reykjavik, Iceland, hrefnas@ khi.is; 2 FIRE consultancy

Wayne Linklater, Ian Mclean, Karin Pulskamp, Elissa Cameron and Natalie Schmitt

which males compete with other males for access to females and females are selective of their mates. However, the social system of quokkas is characterized by subtlety in social relationships which required detailed information on known individuals over at least two breeding seasons to detect. Keywords

Joan B. Silk

SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS OF MALE BONNET MACAQUES: MALE BONDING IN A MATRILINEAL SOCIETY by JOAN B. SILK1) (Department of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024; Califor- nia Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, U.S.A.) (With 2 Figures

Susan Perry

MALE-FEMALE SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS IN WILD WHITE-FACED CAPUCHINS (CEBUS CAPUCINUS) by SUSAN PERRY1,2) (Department of Anthropology, UCLA, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; Department of Anthropology, 13-15 H.M. Tory Bldg., Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H4 Canada) (Acc. 7-X-1996

Joan Silk, Dorothy Cheney and Robert Seyfarth

THE STRUCTURE OF SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS AMONG FEMALE SAVANNA BABOONS IN MOREMI RESERVE, BOTSWANA by JOAN B. SILK 1,2) , ROBERT M. SEYFARTH 3) and DOROTHY L. CHENEY 4,5) ( 1 Department of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 3 Department of Psychology, University of

Michele P. Verderane, Patrícia Izar, Elisabetta Visalberghi and Dorothy M. Fragaszy

pattern of social relationship established among them (Wrangham, 1980 ; Isbell, 1991 ; but see Sterck et al., 1997 for additional factors affecting females social relationships). According to socioecological models, females can compete directly (contest competition) or indirectly (scramble

Patrícia Izar

FEMALE SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS OF CEBUS APELLA NIGRITUS IN A SOUTHEASTERN ATLANTIC FOREST: AN ANALYSIS THROUGH ECOLOGICAL MODELS OF PRIMATE SOCIAL EVOLUTION by PATRÍCIA IZAR 1,2) (Department of General Ecology, University of São Paulo, Brazil) (Acc. 14-X-2003) Summary Theoretical models about

D.P. Dickson, D.A. Wieckert and G.R. Barr

SOCIAL RELATIONSHIP OF DAIRY COWS IN A FEED LOT by D. P. DICKSON, G. R. BARR and D. A. WIECKERT 1)2)3) (Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison (Wisc.), USA) (With 2 Figures) (Rec. 1-X-1966) Social organization is a phenomenon found among nearly all groups of animals that

R.I.M. Dunbar

STRUCTURE OF GELADA BABOON REPRODUCTIVE UNITS I. STABILITY OF SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS by R. I. M. DUNBAR 1) (King's College Research Centre, Cambridge, England) (With 2 Figures) (Acc. 16-X-1978) Gelada baboons (Theropithecus gelada) live in one-male reproductive units that contain, on average, one

Truman Young and Lynne Isbell

ECOLOGICAL MODELS OF FEMALE SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS IN PRIMATES: SIMILARITIES, DISPARITIES, AND SOME DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE CLARITY by LYNNE A. ISBELL 1) and TRUMAN P. YOUNG 2) (Departments of Anthropology and Environmental Horticulture, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA) (Acc. 30-XI