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Author: Zaharna

Th e Hague Journal of Diplomacy 2 (2007) 213-228 Th e Soft Power Differential: Network Communication and Mass Communication in Public Diplomacy * R.S. Zaharna School of Communication, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington DC 20016-8017, United States zaharna

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009 DOI 10.1163/187398609X430624 brill.nl/mjcc MEJCC Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication 2 (2009) 76–99 Humor Against Hegemony: Al-Hurra, Jokes, and the Limits of American Soft Power William Lafi Youmans University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA

In: Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication

obtain preferred outcomes in world politics because other countries want to follow it, admiring its values, emulating its example, and aspiring to its level of prosperity and openness. While many real-world situations involve all three types of power, and soft power alone is rarely sufficient, its

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

preferred outcomes in world politics because other countries want to follow it, admiring its values, emulating its example, and aspiring to its level of prosperity and openness. While many real-world situations involve all three types of power, and soft power alone is rarely sufficient, its presence can be

In: Debating Public Diplomacy

governments play “soft power” games and develop distinctive strategies for reviving Chinese-language education in Thailand. Below is a discussion of the formation of modern Chinese schools in Southeast Asia which may shed some light on Chinese-language education in Siam/Thailand. Chinese Schools in

In: Journal of Chinese Overseas
Author: Yanling Yang

1 Introduction: Beyond the Anglophone World The Chinese government has doubled its budget for projecting soft power during Xi Jinping’s presidency, from US$4.75 billion in 2011 to $9.5 billion in 2018. 1 In contrast, US President Donald Trump’s administration has announced a 29 per cent

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Author: Rui Yang

1 Introduction The term of soft power was first forged by the Harvard University political scientist Joseph S. Nye (1990) , who borrowed what Peter Bachrach and Morton Baratz called the “second face of power” much earlier, in relation to a country’s power of attraction and persuasion as distinct

In: The Rise of China-U.S. International Cooperation in Higher Education

foreign countries. Very often these appeals can be approached through the concept of soft power that represents an alternative to the realist and territorially-determined ways of thinking about international relations, including their geopolitical component. The idea of soft power itself stems from a

In: Russian Politics

Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication 2 (2009) 33–50 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009 DOI 10.1163/187398609X430606 brill.nl/mjcc MEJCC Th e Case of Iranian Cultural Diplomacy in Syria Nadia von Maltzahn University of Oxford Abstract Th e study of intra-regional use of soft power

In: Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication
Author: Paul Nantulya

1 Introduction * Soft power has been the primary means through which China has interacted with Africa since the Tang Dynasty (618–907 AD ). The ancient Silk Road, which extended from China to East Asia, Southern Europe, Persia, the Arabian Peninsula, and East Africa was the primary

In: The African Review