Studies on Sufism provides a forum for original scholarship on Sufism as situated within all of its temporal, geographical, linguistic, cultural and intellectual contexts. The series is open to all disciplinary perspectives and relevant topics of inquiry and publishes monographic studies, edited volumes, and critical editions and translations of texts. Contributions are welcome in English, French or German.
Sufism in Central Asia: New Perspectives on Sufi Traditions, 15th-21st Centuries brings together ten original studies on historical aspects of Sufism in this region. A central question, of ongoing significance, underlies each contribution: what is the relationship between Sufism as it was manifested in this region prior to the Russian conquest and the Soviet era, on the one hand, and the features of Islamic religious life in the region during the Tsarist, Soviet, and post-Soviet eras on the other? The authors address multiple aspects of Central Asian religious life rooted in Sufism, examining interpretative strategies, realignments in Sufi communities and sources from the Russian to the post-Soviet period, and social, political and economic perspectives on Sufi communities.
Contributors include: Shahzad Bashir, Devin DeWeese, Allen Frank, Jo-Ann Gross, Kawahara Yayoi, Robert McChesney, Ashirbek Muminov, Maria Subtelny, Eren Tasar, and Waleed Ziad.
Author: Sajjad Rizvi

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/157006010X514497 Die Welt des Islams 50 (2010) 224-242 Sayyid Niʿmat Allāh al-Jazāʾirī and his Anthologies: Anti-Sufism, Shiʿism and Jokes in the Safavid World Sajjad H. Rizvi Exeter Abstract e paper examines an important Arabic anthology of

In: Die Welt des Islams
A Critical Edition of Kitāb al-Bayāḍ wa-l-Sawād by Abū l-Ḥasan al-Sīrjānī (d. ca.470/1077)
Editors: Bilal Orfali and Nada Saab
This critical Arabic text edition of K. al-Bayāḍ wa-l-sawād min khaṣāʾiṣ ḥikam al-ʿibād fī naʿt al-murīd wa-l-murād ("The Black and White in the Words of Wisdom by Bondsmen Describing the Seeker and the Mystic Quest"), a substantial handbook of early Sufism by Abū l-Ḥasan ʿAlī b. al-Ḥasan al-Sīrjānī (d. ca. 470/1077), is based on three manuscripts and is introduced by a detailed analytical study of the author and his work. The work is written in the tone of a guiding Sufi master and collects the mystical tradition of early Sufis in the form of anecdotes and concise aphorisms to instill guiding wisdom into the hearts of aspiring Sufi adepts. K. al-Bayāḍ wa-l-sawād forms an integral part of Sufi literature and is an essential source for the intellectual history of Islam until the middle of the 5th/11th century.
Author: Mun'im Sirry

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/157006011X556102 Die Welt des Islams 51 (2011) 75-108 Jamāl al-Dīn al-Qāsimī and the Salafi Approach to Sufism Mun’im Sirry * Chicago, IL Abstract is article problematizes the general assumption about the inherent anti-Sufi tendency of the

In: Die Welt des Islams

1 Introduction The word ‘journey’ ( safar ) comes up frequently in ethical and mystical sources in the Islamic tradition. Journey in its basic and literal use, means transfer from one place to another. Journey not only was used literally In Sufism, but also used metaphorically to describe death

In: Journal of Sufi Studies
ʿUmar al-Suhrawardī and the Rise of the Islamic Mystical Brotherhoods
Author: Erik Ohlander
Although the early thirteenth century was a critical period in the development of Sufism, it has received little scholarly attention. Based on heretofore unexplored sources, this book examines a pivotal figure from this period: the scholar, mystic, statesman, and eponym of one of the earliest ṭarīqa lineages, ʿUmar al-Suhrawardī. In situating Suhrawardī’s life work in its social, political, and religious contexts, this book suggests that his universalizing Sufi system was not only enmeshed within a broader economy of Muslim religious learning, but also furnished social spaces which allowed for novel modes of participation in Sufi religiosity. In doing so, this book provides a framework for understanding the increasingly ubiquitous presence of intentional Sufi communities and institutions throughout the late-medieval Islamic world.
The Handbook of Sufi Studies (HSUF) series serves as the principal reference tool for the field of Sufi studies and an essential forum for theoretically and methodologically sophisticated discussions of the major themes and research methods related to this field.

The goal of HSUF is not just to describe and summarize the findings of the previous scholarship on Sufism but also to engage critically it and to offer new ways to approach it. Special attention is paid to the applicability to Sufi studies of methodological tools developed by sociology, cultural anthropology, subaltern and gender studies, religious studies, literary theory and discourse analysis.

Each volume of the series consists of a general introduction by the editor(s) followed by several general analytic essays on the topics at hand. Each analytical essay, in its turn, introduces several sub-chapters focusing on a particular issue within the overall thematic scope of the chapter. Written by major experts on Sufism, the Handbook of Sufi Studies (HSUF) series is meant to be a standard reference for both specialists in Islamic and religious studies and non-specialists interested in a balanced and academically rigorous discussion of Sufism.
New Perspectives on Jāmī’s Salāmān va Absāl
Author: Chad Lingwood
In Politics, Poetry, and Sufism in Medieval Iran Chad Lingwood offers new insights into the political significance of poetry and Sufism at the court of Sulṭān Ya‘qūb (d. 896/1490), leader of the Āq Qoyūnlū. The basis of the study is Salāmān va Absāl, a Persian allegorical romance ‘Abd al-Raḥmān Jāmī (d. 898/1492), the great Timurid belletrist and Naqshbandi Sufi, dedicated to Ya‘qūb. Lingwood demonstrates that Salāmān va Absāl, which modern critics have dismissed as ‘crude’ and ‘grotesque,’ is a sophisticated work of political and mystical advice for a Muslim ruler. In the process, he challenges received wisdom concerning Jāmī, the Āq Qoyūnlū, and Perso-Islamic advice literature. Significantly, the study illustrates the extent to which Jāmī’s compositions integrated the Timurid and Āq Qoyūnlū realms.