Religious Change among Oromo Muslims in Bale, Ethiopia
Author: Terje Østebø
The political transition in 1991 and the new regime’s policy towards the ethnic and religious diversity in Ethiopia have contributed to increased activities from various Islamic reform movements. Among these, we find the Salafi movement which expanded rapidly throughout the 1990s, particularly in the Oromo-speaking south-eastern parts of the country. This book sheds light on the emergence and expansion of Salafism in Bale. Focusing on the diversified body of situated actors and their role in the process of religious change, it discusses the early arrival of Salafism in the late 1960s, follows it through the Marxist period (1974-1991) before discussing the rapid expansion of the movement in the 1990s. The movement’s dynamics and the controversies emerging as a result of the reforms are discussed, particularly with reference to different understandings of sources for religious knowledge and the role of Islamic literacy.

Although in recent years Salafism has attracted much scholarly attention, empirical research using methods of participatory observation and qualitative or ethnographic interviews is still rare (Hummel, Kamp, and Spielhaus 2016, 21). As Zoltan Pall and Mohamed-Ali Adraoui (2018, 135) conclude, the

In: Journal of Muslims in Europe
Author: Terje Østebø

Introduction The Malian conflict in 2012, the continued al-Shabaab insurgency in Somalia, the violence perpetuated by Boko Haram in Nigeria, and the Islamic State’s offensive in Iraq have significantly affected perceptions of what has become known as Salafism. Connected to general attitudes

In: Islamic Africa
Author: Søren Gilsaa

representatives of a “tolerant Islam” that is in sync with Tanzania’s acclaimed “nationhood”. However, the idea of an intrusion of internationalist Salafism is inadequate both in terms of understanding the Ansār Sunna’s theological roots, and for what this cluster of organizations comprises in terms of

In: Islamic Africa
Author: Iman Dawood

salaf al-salih (pious ancestors), focus on tawhid (the unicity of God), eschew shirk (polytheism), and purge Islam of bidʾa (innovations), while employing a more literal interpretation of the Qurʾan and Sunna. 2 The Salafi label has thus been preferred by researchers as it “may have positive

In: Journal of Muslims in Europe
Author: Maszlee Malik

Introduction Salafism, as a trend and theological movement, has become a point of interest for many researchers due to the current global political escalation, in particular regarding issues related to global terrorism, radicalism, post-Arab Spring politics, religious trends, as well as

In: Sociology of Islam

focus on activists of a Muslim organisation known for its Salafist orientation. The selected cases show how a similar understanding of Islam can be traced back to different life courses, as well as to various patterns of social networks. Starting with a brief definition of Salafism, the article goes

In: Journal of Muslims in Europe

is gradually reshaping both anti-Sufism dear to Salafism and Sufi practices themselves. The article is based on ethnographic materials collected in Niger in the last four years among youth promoters of the Sunna and defenders of a religious life in line with the “Pious Ancestors.” As I contend, anti

In: Islamic Africa

After more than two decades of civil war, the Salafi reality in Somalia has over the last ten years been encapsulated by the rise of a movement that most security websites describe as “Salafi-Jihadi”: Ḥarakat al-Shabāb al-Mujāhidīn (hereafter al-Shabaab). Yet, Salafism in Somalia does not fit

In: Islamic Africa

The Sources of Salafi daʿwa ? The term Salafism derives from the reference to the “pious forefathers” ( al-salaf al-salih ), or more specifically to a hadith collected by Muhammad ibn Ismail al-Bukhari (810-870) in which the Prophet Muhammad was reported to have said that “the best of my

In: Journal of Muslims in Europe