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Abstract

Located in Vidisha District, Madhya Pradesh, the area of Badoh-Pathari is home to a rock shelter with a sculpted panel depicting seven mother goddesses. A weathered inscription next to the sculptures was reported as early as 1926. The inscription is dateable to the fifth century on the basis of its palaeography and the art-historical dating of the site. Though partly effaced beyond hope of decipherment, roughly half of the text can be read with confidence, while some of the rest may be restored conjecturally, and some speculatively. The epigraph pays homage to Rudra and Skanda in addition to the Mothers themselves, and is thus a key resource concerning mātṛ worship in the Gupta period. It mentions the otherwise unknown local ruler Jayatsena of Avamukta (a region also named in the Allahabad pillar inscription), and may refer to the reign of Kumāragupta (I).

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

H A T T A C H A R Y A , KAMALESWAR, 'The Language of Nfigfirjuna's Sanskrit Texts', K. N. Mishra (ed.), Aspects of Buddhist Sanskrit (Sarnath, Varanasi, 1993), pp. 220--236. , 'Some Observations on the Sanskrit Epigraphy of Cambodia', Corolla Torontonensis, Studies in honour of Ronald Morton Smith

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

, Virāṭaparva 95), being a calque on the Sanskrit sāmantarāja = ‘vassal king’. Indeed, in medieval Sanskrit epigraphy and belles lettres , rājan alone conventionally expresses the same meaning. 5 In an (unfortunately, lacunose) passage of the Pucaṅan inscription (lines 28–30, Kern 1917), ratu would

-lranian Journal 36: 273--286, 1993. 274 P U B L I C A T I O N S R E C E I V E D Raghunfitha giromani et la Tikd de Jagadiga Tarkfila .mkfira (suite)', Journal Asiatique CCLXXIX/3--4 (1991), pp. 289--325. , 'Sanskrit Epigraphy of Cambodia: where does it stand?', The Visvabharati Quarterly, New Series Volume 2

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

. Schmiedchen, Annette (2010/11), ‘Religious Patronage and Political Power: The Ambivalent Character of Royal Donations in Sanskrit Epigraphy’, Journal of Ancient Indian History 27: 154–166. Schopen, Gregory (2000/2005), ‘The Mahāyāna and the Middle Period of Indian Buddhism: Through a Chinese Looking

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

, Viraktivithikd. Mangalore, S. Krishnamuthy, 1984. vi, 60 pp. , lnarne given here as Manjunatha I, Bhaktivithikd. Mangalore, M. Manjunatha Bhat, 1987. ix, 45 pp. BHATFACHARYA, KAMALESWAR, 'Lexicographical gleanings from the Sanskrit epigraphy from Cambodia', lndological Studies. Prof. D. (', Sircar Commemoration

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

, including the planning and the taking of the picture. Gubernatis had already heard of this “learned and holy Brahman”—who was a specialist in Sanskrit, epigraphy, and numismatics—before his arrival in India. He also knew that he had used his skills and knowledge to assist British, German, and Dutch scholars

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

records found in India is greatly hampered b y t h e fact t h a t the relevant publications are so widely dispersed. A corpus of the inscriptions of a single region is very useful for t h e study of the language and vocabulary of Sanskrit epigraphy. However, w i t h o u t a detailed index it is difficult

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

Sanskrit education systems', JAsSoc (Calcutta), XXVIII (1986), pp. 129--138 \[A plea for modernizing the methods of teaching Sanskrit in India.\] B H A T T A C H A R Y A , KAMALESWAR, 'The present state of researches on the Sanskrit epigraphy of Cambodia: some observations', Amrtadhdrd, Prof R N Dandekar

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

: Abhidharma across Buddhist Scholastic Traditions , edited by Bart Dessein and Weijeng Teng, 47–107. Leiden; Boston: Brill. Schmiedchen, Annette. 2010–2011. ‘Religious Patronage and Political Power: The Ambivalent Character of Royal Donations in Sanskrit Epigraphy.’ Journal of Ancient India History 27

In: Indo-Iranian Journal