1 Image Problems Philosophers have image problems, and sophists know this. Whatever the truth and value of their task, philosophers, “appearing as all sorts because of the ignorance of others” ( Sophist 216b4), 1 seem to be the same as sophists. Philosophers may try to differentiate themselves

In: Plato and the Moving Image
Author: Fiona Leigh

Introduction Accomplishing the task the Eleatic Stranger outlines at Sophist 255c9-11 – telling apart the Forms, Being and Difference – is no mean feat. For each of the five Forms under discussion from 254c onwards share in both Forms, in virtue of which both properties, being a being and

In: Phronesis
Author: Eric D. Perl

Plato’s forms are often characterized—not to say caricaturized—as inert, lifeless objects, enthroned in a “Platonic heaven” like so many lumps of intelligible stone. In the Sophist , however, in a passage which is usually altogether ignored in such accounts of Plato’s thought, Plato himself

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition
Author: Laurent Lavaud

demonstrate how the megista genē structure primary ousia : Plotinus makes both an original and decisive use of the concept of something ‘completive’ of substance (συµπληρωτικόν). He is thus able to construct an innovative ontology integrating the heritage of the Sophist while breaking with the

In: Phronesis
Author: Alex Priou

being philosophers—when looking down from above on the life of those below, seem to some to be deserving (τίµιοι) of nothing, while to others worthy of all, and sometimes they appear to be statesmen, at other times sophists, and there are other times when they furnish the opinion that they are

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition
This volume, the thirtieth year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2013-14. The paper topics include: pleasure in the Philebus under the rubric of the fourfold structure of reality; the tension between the good of the city and the good of the citizens in the Republic; the relation of self-knowledge to dialectic in Theaetetus and Alcibiades I; a close examination of the interplay of the characters in the Sophist to counter Plato’s replacement of Socrates by the Eleatic Stranger; and three autobiographical passages in different dialogues to establish philosophical practice as intellectual and emotional together.
This volume, the thirtieth year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2013-14. The paper topics include: pleasure in the Philebus under the rubric of the fourfold structure of reality; the tension between the good of the city and the good of the citizens in the Republic; the relation of self-knowledge to dialectic in Theaetetus and Alcibiades I; a close examination of the interplay of the characters in the Sophist to counter Plato’s replacement of Socrates by the Eleatic Stranger; and three autobiographical passages in different dialogues to establish philosophical practice as intellectual and emotional together.
Author: Rebecca LeMoine

life, few would advise engaging with bullies to cultivate moderation. 1 Yet, as this essay will argue, this is precisely what Plato’s Euthydemus recommends. Depicting a conversation in which Socrates tries to persuade Crito to enroll himself and his sons in the classes of two sophists, the

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
Author: Craig A. Gibson

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/157007210X493489 Vigiliae Christianae 64 (2010) 496-500 brill.nl/vc Vi g i l i a e C h r i s t i a n a e Was Nicolaus the Sophist a Christian? Craig A. Gibson The University of Iowa, Department of Classics, Iowa City, IA 52242-1418 USA craig

In: Vigiliae Christianae
This volume, the thirty-first year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2014-15. Paper topics include: the volatility of ἔρως in the Symposium as not self-directed to good or bad; the ‘analytical’ reading of the tripartite soul as autonomous sub-agents and whether it resembles neuroscience; holiness in the Euthyphro as misconstrued by the difficulty translating finite passives and passive participles in English; evil in Proclus as an indefinite nature redefined by privation, subcontrary and parypostasis, contrary to Plotinus’ identification of matter and evil; Plato’s literary reworking of the encounter of Odysseus with the Cyclops in the Sophist and of his struggle with the suitors in the Statesman.