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DELAYED BREEDING IN AVIAN SOCIAL SYSTEMS: THE ROLE OF TERRITORY QUALITY AND "FLOATER" TACTICS by STEVE ZACK and BRIDGET J. STUTCHBURY1,2) (Department of Biology and Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, U.S.A.) (With 3 Figures) (Acc. 30-XI-1992) Summary In

In: Behaviour
Author: Jan Komdeur

evidence that dominant females on low-quality territories have no modes to suppress or prevent subor- dinate females from joint laying: ( i ) The frequency of joint laying in multi-female groups is independent of territory quality; ( ii ) There is no aggression among females at the nest around the time of

In: Behaviour

. Keywords : female emancipation, paternal care, polygyny, territory quality. Introduction Extra-pair paternity, which results from a female copulating with a male other than her social partner, is both frequent and widespread among monog- amous birds (Petrie & Kempenaers, 1998). However, despite much study

In: Behaviour

. These changes may have resulted from the decrease in variation in territory quality observed in the population over the study period. Our findings strengthen the view that natal dispersal is a highly plastic response to local ecological and social circumstances, and clearly show that rates of sex

In: Behaviour

When male birds defend all-purpose breeding territories, females may select mates based on indicators of male or territory quality, or both. However, in non-experimental studies, it can be difficult to determine which traits females prefer because measures of male and territory quality frequently

In: Behaviour

: cooperative breeding, between-group dispersal, social network, territory quality, biological markets, Cichlidae, Neolamprologus pulcher/brichardi . 1) Corresponding authour: Ralph Bergmüller; present address: Department of Eco-Ethologie, Zoological Institute, University of Neuchâtel, Rue Emile-Argand 11, Case

In: Behaviour

terms of territory quality and paternal care are not important in the choice of long-tailed males (e.g., Møller, 1990a; de Lope & Møller, 1993; reviewed in Møller, 1994a). On the basis of these clear relationships, European barn swallows collectively became a classic example of female mate choice based

In: Behaviour

the first males back select the best ter- ritories, and that another way in which females might maximize their chances of successful breeding is by selecting the best territory and the male who holds it. Measuring territory quality is a difficult problem, par- ticularly in selecting what to measure

In: Behaviour

social pairing ( i.e. harem size) largely depended on territory quality and thereby on success in competition over the best territories. Old males and males with high body mass had a greater chance of mating polygynously, while Ž rst-year males and males of low body weight more often remained unmated. In

In: Behaviour

provision of extra food significantly reduced the age at which fledglings reached independence, indicating that territory quality may affect the timing of independence. The effects of extra food on brood division were unclear. 6. There was no differential splitting of the brood between the dominant male and

In: Behaviour