Yongxian LUO

The Tai-Kadai languages form one of the world’s major language families, as they are spoken by close to 100 million speakers (Diller et al. 2008). The language family extends over a vast linguistic area covering much of mainland Southeast Asia. Within China, Tai-Kadai speakers occupy an area

Alain Peyraube

This article poses two main questions: can the history of genes help us understand better what the Chinese linguistic situation was some 5,000 years B.P., not to mention the population distribution in China? Consequently can the history of genes helps us in grouping the languages of China and East Asia into families and macro-families?

Languages and genes have two different histories and two different types of evolution – one being natural, the other one largely cultural – with different mechanisms of origin and reproduction. Nonetheless, there are indeed many clear analogies in the mechanisms of transmission: mutation, natural selection, migration, and chance. These have lead population geneticists and linguists to look for any congruence in genetic and linguistic evolution, in order to correlate genetic and linguistic distance.

In light of these congruences, but also of non-correlations existing between the genetic classification of populations and the classification of languages, the different hypotheses concerning the traditional grouping of languages (Sino-Tibetan, Austronesian, Austro-Asiatic, Tai-Kadai , Miao-Yao or Hmong-Mjen, Altaic), as well as the new groupings in macro-families (Austric, Austro-Tai, Sino-Tibetan-Austronesian, Sino-Indo-European, Sino-Caucasian, Proto-East-Asian, etc.) will be discussed.

It will be concluded that while we have various hypotheses, we are not sure of anything. The considerable accumulation of data in population genetics has rendered the landscape much less simple, all the more so since the theoretical models of evolution necessary to interpret the genetic data in historical context are still being refined.

Edited by Paul Sidwell and Mathias Jenny

This section of Grammars and Sketches of the World's Languages deals specifically with the languages of mainland and insular South East Asia, including but not limited to Austroasiatic, Hmong-Mien, Tai-Kadai, Tibeto-Burman, Austronesian and Andamanese.
This section of Grammars and Sketches of the World's Languages deals specifically with the languages of mainland and insular South East Asia, and is open to all language families of the area: Austroasiatic, Hmong-Mien, Tai-Kadai, Tibeto-Burman, Austronesian and Andamanese. Contributions can come from a range of sources, including: dissertations, field notes, and reworkings of extant studies. Ideally they will include a basic lexicon and appendix of glossed texts. For print volumes we prefer at least 200 printed book pages, these can include multiple short sketches forming coherent volumes. Shorter works as stand-alone publications can be presented as e-editions. Media files (images, audio, video) can be included in e-editions or as links in print volumes (subject to copyright considerations).

We encourage a unifying typological approach, so that these volumes are both accessible to typologists coming from different theoretical backgrounds and intelligible to the wider linguistic readership. Authors are expected to follow Leipzig glossing rules and IPA conventions. The editors may specify the TOC structure and the list of abbreviations; these will be discussed with authors at the book proposal stage.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editors will work with authors to ensure high standards. We seek to build a diverse and highly qualified Advisory Board; interested scholars should contact the editors. For information on book proposals and publishing with Brill, please see the Resources for Authors pages.

Series:

Peter Norquest

In A Phonological Reconstruction of Proto-Hlai, Norquest presents a reconstruction of Proto-Hlai based on data from twelve Hlai languages spoken on Hainan, China. This reconstruction includes chapters on both the Proto-Hlai initials and rimes, and original sesquisyllabic forms are shown to be necessary to account for the reflexes between the daughter languages. A comparison is made between Proto-Hlai and Proto-Tai, and a preliminary reconstruction of Proto Southern Kra-Dai (the immediate ancestor of Proto-Hlai) is performed. When this is compared with Proto-Hlai, it is shown that several important sound changes occurred between Pre-Hlai and Proto-Hlai. The aberrant Jiamao language is also examined, focusing on its complex contact relationships with other Hlai languages.

Laurent SAGART

shǎngshēng respectively under the Haudricourt-Pulleyblank-Mei solution: sonorant endings, [h]-endings, [ʔ]-endings. Subsequent attempts at solving the origin of Kra-Dai tones have assumed Gedney’s hypothesis. Benedict (1942) claimed that the Kra-Dai languages (“Tai-Kadai” in his terminology) are a sister

Matthias GERNER

Like many Austro-Tai languages and many Sino-Tibetan languages, Kam (Dong 侗) exhibits a wealth of descriptive syllables after the verb or the adjective. These syllables, henceforth called expressives, are typically reduplicated and cover a wide range of functions such as grading, speed and manner modification, and various kinds of sound symbolism, metaphor, etc. I propose to view the expressive compound as a sign: the predicate-head functions as the signified and the expressive as the signifier. In fact, since the predicate-head itself has the classical Saussurean sign anatomy, the headexpressive compound presents the case of a complex sign or what I call a second-order sign. The attested types of relationship that hold between the signified and signifier spread across almost the whole spectrum of sign species recognized in the literature. This paper is the result of a survey of ca. 260 expressives and is one product of a long-term Kam dictionary project.

Matthias GERNER

Like many Austro-Tai languages and many Sino-Tibetan languages, Kam (Dong 侗) exhibits a wealth of descriptive syllables after the verb or the adjective. These syllables, henceforth called expressives, are typically reduplicated and cover a wide range of functions such as grading, speed and manner modification, and various kinds of sound symbolism, metaphor, etc. I propose to view the expressive compound as a sign: the predicate-head functions as the signified and the expressive as the signifier. In fact, since the predicate-head itself has the classical Saussurean sign anatomy, the head-expressive compound presents the case of a complex sign or what I call a second-order sign. The attested types of relationship that hold between the signified and signifier spread across almost the whole spectrum of sign species recognized in the literature. This paper is the result of a survey of ca 260 expressives and is one of the achievements of a long-term Kam dictionary project.

Qabiao language (Pǔbiāo 普标, Pupeo): Tai-Kadai LanguagesQašqarliq (people of Kashgar): Altaic LanguagesQawo language: Tai-Kadai Languagesqí 其, etymology: Chinese Linguistics in the German Speaking WorldQí 齊, linguistically different from Wú 吴 and Yuè 越: Ancient Wú 吳 Languageqiān chēng 謙稱 ‘self

, bilinguals: Bilingualism, Neurolinguistic StudiesPaekche language, Chinese readings: Sino-Xenic ReadingsPaha language (Bāhā 巴哈): Tai-Kadai LanguagesPaiwanic: Puyuma LanguagePáiwān 排灣: Austronesian Languages |...

Yǎdū 雅都: Qiāng 羌 LanguageYakka hitsubi 譯家必備 (Translator’s essentials): Chinese in NagasakiYǎláng 雅郎 language: Tai-Kadai LanguagesYale Mandarin Romanization, romanizations: Transcription Systems: for CantoneseYami: Austronesian Languages | Languages and Language FamiliesYān Chinese: Chinese in