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Digital technology significantly expands the resources available to scholars seeking to reconstruct ancient manuscripts and, in combination with conventional philology, contributes to a more accurate reconstruction of both the text and the line breaks of col. 2 of the Temple Scroll. The column’s fragmentary condition led Yadin and Qimron to diverge in their reconstructions of the manuscript’s line-breaks and its lacunae. The problem is most acute at 2:8–9, where the scroll’s composer expanded the base text of Exod 34 with Deut 7:25–26. By employing techniques of digital mapping in conjunction with historical syntax, this article helps reconstruct the column’s line-breaks, helps restore the lacunae, and offers a refined reconstruction of the column.

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Paul Cizek

Abstract

The Temple Scroll (11QTa 53:11–54:5) and Damascus Document (CD 16:6–12) each appropriate legislation concerning vows and oaths from Deut 23:22–24 and Num 30:3–17. Lawrence H. Schiffman, who has offered the only at-length comparison of these appropriations, characterizes these halakhot as incongruent and links this conclusion with his position that the Temple Scroll is Sadducean and the Damascus Document comes from a later Sadducean splinter group. However, my analysis leads to a different conclusion. I demonstrate that the authors of the Temple Scroll and Damascus Document evidence distinct aims in their appropriations of shared base texts, but not necessarily incongruence nor intentional divergence.

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Authors: A.M. Reimer and W.J. Lyons

: Scholars Press, 1990) 28. 22 reproduced verbatim in the Temple Scroll ( 11 QTa 60:16-21 ).26 Expla- nations must, therefore, be procured to account for the presence of what we define as "magic" within the corpus of religious texts. To borrow a phrase from Aune, "the term "magic" itself has [become] a

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Bruce Zuckerman

detached from recto to verso and then reattached to the verso (but in another locus) during successive rolling and unrolling of a scroll. Of course, the most well-known scroll with the print-through phenomenon is the Temple Scroll (11QTa), but numerous other examples exist as well. Moreover, if the skin of

In: Dead Sea Discoveries