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Author: Aomar Boum

Located in West Africa near the river Niger in the country of Mali, Timbuktu developed as an important trading center of the Empire of Mali in the fourteenth century. In the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, under the Songhai Empire, the city became one of the most prosperous trans

autumn they went back to their homes in Arawan. At last they settled definitely on the site of this town. Timbuktu became an important commercial centre; travellers reached it either by the river or by caravans from the coast of Morocco and Tripolitania. The people of Wag̲h̲daw migrated thither in

Al-Sa‘dī's Ta’rīkh Al-sūdān down to 1613 and other Contemporary Documents
Author: John Hunwick
The principal text translated in this volume is the Ta’rīkh Al-sūdān of the seventeenth-century Timbuktu scholar ‘Abd al-Raḥmān al-Sa‘dī. Thirty chapters are included, dealing with the history of Timbuktu and Jenne, their scholars, and the political history of the Songhay empire from the reign of Sunni ‘Alī (1464-1492) through Moroccan conquest of Songhay in 1591 and down to the year 1613 when the Pashalik of Timbuktu became an autonomous ruling institution in the Middle Niger region. The year 1613 also marked the effective end of Songhay resistance. The other contemporary documents included are a new English translation of Leo Africanus's description of West Africa, some letters relating to Sa‘dīan diplomacy and conquests in the Sahara and Sahel, al-Ifrānī's account of Sa‘dīan conquest of Songhay, and an account of this expedition by an anonymous Spaniard.

This publication has also been published in paperback, please click here for details.
Al-Sa‘dī's Ta’rīkh al-sūdān down to 1613 and other Contemporary Documents
Author: Hunwick
The principal text translated in this volume is the Ta’rīkh Al-sūdān of the seventeenth-century Timbuktu scholar ‘Abd al-Raḥmān al-Sa‘dī. Thirty chapters are included, dealing with the history of Timbuktu and Jenne, their scholars, and the political history of the Songhay empire from the reign of Sunni ‘Alī (1464-1492) through Moroccan conquest of Songhay in 1591 and down to the year 1613 when the Pashalik of Timbuktu became an autonomous ruling institution in the Middle Niger region. The year 1613 also marked the effective end of Songhay resistance. The other contemporary documents included are a new English translation of Leo Africanus's description of West Africa, some letters relating to Sa‘dīan diplomacy and conquests in the Sahara and Sahel, al-Ifrānī's account of Sa‘dīan conquest of Songhay, and an account of this expedition by an anonymous Spaniard.

This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details.

Timbuktu’s seventeenth-century tārīkhs : the Tārīkh al-Sūdān , the so-called Tārīkh al-fattāsh , and the Notice historique piqued the interest of Westerners since the mid nineteenth-century. 1 In 1853 Heinrich Barth obtained a copy of the Tārīkh al-Sūdān . Figaro journalist Felix

In: Islamic Africa
Manuscript Culture, Arabic Literacy and Intellectual History in Muslim Africa
Volume Editors: Graziano Krätli and Ghislaine Lydon
As the manuscript treasures in the libraries of Timbuktu and throughout the northwestern quarter of Africa become known, many questions are raised. How did a manuscript culture flourish in the Sahara and in Muslim Africa more generally? Under what conditions did African intellectuals thrive, and how did they acquire scholarly works and the writing paper necessary to contribute to knowledge? By exploring the history of the trans-Saharan book and paper trades, the scholarly production and teaching curriculae of African Muslims and the formation, preservation and codicology of library collections, the authors of this original volume provide a variety of answers. The select number of invited contributions represents current research in the material, technological, economic, and cultural dimensions of manuscript production, circulation, and preservation, and the development of specific scholarly and intellectual traditions in Saharan and Sudanic Africa
Author: Shamil Jeppie

examples come from the town of Timbuktu in northern Mali and occasionally illustrative materials will be brought in from adjacent areas or beyond. Writing Africans Arabic is the language of the vast majority of the texts in Mali and other areas with traditions of Islamic scholarship. The writers

In: Philological Encounters