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A Journal of University-Industry-Government Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Editor-in-Chief: Henry Etzkowitz
The Triple Helix of university-industry-government relations is an internationally recognized model for understanding entrepreneurship, the changing dynamics of universities, innovation and socio-economic development.

The aim of the journal is to publish research for an international audience covering analysis, theory, measurements and empirical enquiry in all aspects of university-industry-government interactions. The objective is to unite key research on the transformations of universities, capitalization of knowledge, translational research, spin-off activities, intellectual property, knowledge and technology transfer, as well as the international bases and dimensions of Triple Helix relations, their impacts, social, economic, political, cultural, health and environmental implications as they arise from and shape Triple Helix interactions.

Open to all innovation authors, the special mission of the journal is to be an international outlet also for innovation scholars from developing countries.

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This paper assesses the extent to which the organization of the innovation effort in firms, as well as the geographical scale at which this effort is pursued, affects the capacity to benefit from product innovations. Three alternative modes of organization are studied: hierarchy, market and triple-helix-type networks. Furthermore, we consider triple-helix networks at three geographical scales: local, national and international. These relationships are tested on a random sample of 763 firms located in five urban regions of Norway which reported having introduced new products or services during the preceding 3 years. The analysis shows that firms exploiting internal hierarchy or triple-helix networks with a wide range of partners managed to derive a significantly higher share of their income from new products, compared to those that mainly relied on outsourcing within the market. In addition, the analysis shows that the geographical scale of cooperation in networks, as well as the type of partner used, matters for the capacity of firms to benefit from product innovation. In particular, firms that collaborate in international triple-helix-type networks involving suppliers, customers and R&D institutions extract a higher share of their income from product innovations, regardless of whether they organize the processes internally or through the network.

In: Triple Helix

Science and technology parks are the three-dimensional expression of the ever-growing importance of innovation, creativity and knowledge as economic resources. Science cities are the next step up: knowledge-based forms of urban settlement. Thanks to a housing project currently being developed, the Berlin-Adlershof science and technology park is undergoing a gradual transformation into a science city. Taking Berlin-Adlershof as a case study, this article examines the extent to which the triple helix approach can be usefully applied to the planning process of a housing project. The triple helix approach has hitherto been mainly used to study the organizational arrangements of industry, university and government, arrangements that are seen to foster processes of innovation. Drawing upon this tenet, the present study focuses on the socio-cultural aspects of urban development in the context of science cities, aspects which have so far received little attention in triple helix research. The aim is to use the triple helix concept to assess the innovative character of the gradual transformation of a science and technology park into a science city through residential development. Within the framework of this study, semi-structured expert interviews with representatives relevant to the Adlershof development were conducted between November 2013 and January 2014. The study showed that the triple helix approach cannot be usefully applied to the interaction of actors involved in residential development in science cities. Alternatively, we propose a model of interaction that highlights the pivotal role of the intermediary in the planning process.

In: Triple Helix

. Palabras-clave Modelo de la Tríple Hélice – Innovación – Sustentabilidad – Construcción de Teoría – Interdisciplinariedad 1 Introduction The unique contribution of the triple helix model ( Etzkowitz & Leydesdorff 1995 ) to innovation studies is its attention to the heightened role of the

In: Triple Helix

The concept of triple helix (TH) cooperation was introduced about two decades ago, as a method of enhancing innovation and value creation. A good networking practice for knowledge-based development should identify the correct balance between business, research and government. The TH model for cooperation embodies an argument for public initiatives in business networks. The purpose of this paper is to test the public role in TH efforts in Norway. This paper therefore poses the following question: What is the public sector’s role in network development and cooperation in Norway when the initiative is based on the triple helix model? Data from five different business networks in Norway has been collected and analysed to answer this question. The results indicate that the public engagement in the different networks varied with the life cycle phase of the network and the public sector’s position in the value chain. The balance between the public and private sphere may vary from as little engagement as possible (laissez-faire) to being an equal TH partner.

In: Triple Helix

This paper aims to illustrate how the triple-helix concept can be implemented on a city level by establishing an intermediary among the scientific, economic, and public administration spheres and civil society. By using the example of Bielefeld 2000plus, an initiative founded for this particular purpose, this paper shows that in today’s knowledge society, certain inter-organizational conflicts and challenges regarding cooperation may arise that an intermediary actor can channel efficiently. Furthermore, Bielefeld 2000plus serves as a prototypical example and is used to derive a theoretical model of such an intermediary actor as both the product of and platform for institutional entrepreneurs who try to elicit institutional change. Drawing on extant literature that examines intermediaries with the triple-helix concept, as well as institutional entrepreneurs, this paper discusses how an intermediary can act as an institutional entrepreneur by adopting a bifunctional framework, with all the advantages and disadvantages that this entails. This framework is condensed into the Bifunctional Intermediary (BFI) Model, which may benefit researchers studying triplehelix processes and practitioners seeking to establish an intermediary.

In: Triple Helix
Author: Tove Brink

financial support for nearshore/offshore wind park energy. This collaborative ecosystem among different institutions is framed in the literature as a ‘triple helix’. The triple helix is noted by Etzkowitz and Leydesdorff (2000) in their seminal paper as an institutional framework among the three parties

In: Triple Helix

traditional approaches to systematic theology in one of the most fascinating chapters of the book, 12B. Part II. Analyzing the Triple Helix Approach Section A. The Methodological Underpinnings of the Triple Helix Approach: Kelsey’s Critique of Traditional Approaches to Secondary Theology In this

In: Journal of Reformed Theology

– interacciones universidad-industria-gobierno – universidad de sede multiple 1 Introduction Within knowledge-based society, Triple Helix has been identified as a catalyst for change and as a tool fostering innovation. In a triadic relationship between university, industry and state, university has been

In: Triple Helix

Triple helix collaborations are evidence and example of larger ‘post-postmodern’ trends that have accelerated the convergence of once clearly established organisational dichotomies, in particular, market/hierarchy, private/public and forprofit/ non-profit. The multiplex hybridity of triple helix collaborations creates unique challenges for the functional and, in particular, advance legal organisation and governance of their social welfare-oriented, quasi-entrepreneurial, quasi-regulatory innovation interactivity. Social innovation, resource valorisation and sustainability—constituting core normative underpinnings and objectives for triple helix models—similarly affect the design and efficiency of hybrid firms that functionally and legally domicile triple helix intermediation. In an effort to help promote the emergence of sui-generis best practices in the intermediation of ‘innovation in innovation’ (Etzkowitz, Stud Sci 42(3):293–337, 2003a) triple helix projects, this article focuses on two interrelated aspects of triple helix hybridity which are less developed in the current literatures: First, based on a well-documented case study of a failed research group-firm hybrid within the University of Helsinki, it examines an institutionalised supra-helical, fourth-party intermediation model for triple helix networks and distinguishes such theoretical model from mere inter-helical self-intermediation in trilateral university-industry-government collaborations. Second, it hypothesises the possible association of supra-helical, fourth-party triple helix intermediation in application with blended private/public, for-profit/non-profit legal entities, in particular, only recently introduced hybrid legal organisations in the UK, the USA, and Canada. The main thesis developed under such dual focus is that the unique legal organisational design and domicile for triple helix intermediation, i.e. what this article terms the supra-helical mode 3 substructure, critically matters—both, for purposes of institutionalising efficient decision-making and governance equilibria in the promotion and operation of real-world triple helix projects and for controlling the agency and social costs of such advanced triple helix collaborations.

In: Triple Helix