No Access

Theodore S. Beers

Introduction Vahshi Bāfqi (d. 991/1583) and Mohtasham Kāshāni (d. 996/1588) have been considered the two greatest Persian poets of their generation. This applies only insofar as we accept what tradition has bequeathed to us in the way of a canon of classical poets, and insofar as we deem

No Access

Rudi Matthee

third contribution as well. The days are long gone that E. G. Browne could dismiss Safavid literature as just derivative and ornamental. Theo Beers illustrates this with a probing study of the poetry of Vahshi Bafqi (d. 991/1583), a prominent poet from the reign of Shah Tahmāsb i who remains less well

No Access

Yui Kanda

-Din Muhammad Kashani (d. 1582–83). 59  Other identifiable figures died in Yazd, Isfahan, and Deccan, suggesting that Muhtasham also versified elegies for those with whom he was personally acquainted, but who died outside his hometown. For instance, Vahshi Bafqi (d. 1583), to whom Muhtasham addressed a series

No Access

Christoph Werner

Thirteenth Century” , JRAS , VI ( 1996 ): pp. 345 - 366 . Lingwood , Chad G. , Politics, Poetry, and Sufism in Medieval Iran: New Perspectives on Jāmī’s Salāmān va Absāl ( Leiden : Brill , 2014 ). Losensky , Paul , “Vaḥši Bāfqi” , in EIr , online edition, 2004, at http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/vahshi

No Access

Jane Lewisohn

being broadcast in all. Th ematically they were devoted to the introduction of a particular poet, whether classical or modern, or a particular composition, event or musician. In particular, they introduced such poets as Vahshi Bāfqi, Parvin E ʿ tesāmi, Amir Firuzkuhi, Naziri Nayshābori, Malek al-Sho ʿ

No Access

Corinne Lefèvre

Hindūstān, this tribe is the wildest and the most rustic ( vaḥshī va rūstātarīn ) among the Indians who dwell in the mountains and in the desert. But, thanks to the education ( tarbiyat ) His Majesty ʿArsh Āstānī [Akbar] gave him, he [the raja] now acquiesces in [the judgment] of those who approve of