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Author: Patrick Stiles

1 The Ingvæonic–Non-Ingvæonic Divergence 1.1 Old English and Old High German The paradigms of the third person anaphoric pronoun in the West Germanic languages show a split between Ingvæonic and non-Ingvæonic. The Ingvæonic dialects have numerous forms with initial h -, in contrast to

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik

deduced from the glosses to position their language within the West-Germanic dialect continuum. 1.1 Previous Research on the Glosses The literature on the Lex Salica and the Malberg glosses reaches far back; the earliest text editions date from the 19th century (Laspeyres, 1833; Merkel & Grimm

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Proceedings of the Symposium Held in Amsterdam, 12-13 June 1989
Etymology is that branch of historical linguistics which studies the history and origin of words, usually presenting its results in dictionary shape. The enduring popular demand for etymological dictionaries has demonstrated the social relevance of this branch of linguistics. The present volume concerns the etymology of the Modern Germanic languages of Western Europe: Dutch, German, English and Frisian.
Current Trends reports on recently completed etymological dictionaries or on such projects in progress. The contributors communicate their experiences in tackling the problems they encountered both in their researches and in shaping their findings. As a result, the volume offers a blend of theoretical and practical approaches to etymological lexicography which makes stimulating reading for university courses in etymology, as many of the problems signalled for one language also apply to other ones. Simultaneously, the book offers the specialist the opportunity to keep abreast of the advances made over the past ten years.
Contributors:
Dutch: Willy Pijnenburg, Rolf H. Bremmer Jr, Arend Quak, Marlies Philippa, and Edgar C. Polomé.
German: Rolf Hiersche, Wolfgang Pfeifer, Willy Sanders, and Elmar Seebold.
English: Terry F. Hoad and Anatoly Liberman.
Frisian: Klaas F. van der Veen.
In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik

criteria for determining descent are idiosyncratic; 2 E & F don’t follow those criteria; 3 by E & F ’s criteria, English is clearly West Germanic (WGmc). First, E & F write (2014: 57) that “no principles of linguistic descent even remotely depend on differences in sources of vocabulary.” Instead, a

In: Language Dynamics and Change
Author: Anders Holmberg

Anglicized Norse? Emonds and Faarlund (2014, this issue; henceforth E & F ) argue that it is the latter. In that sense, Middle English would be North Germanic rather than West Germanic. Consequently, since Modern English is a descendant of Middle English, it, too, would be a North Germanic language. E & F

In: Language Dynamics and Change
Author: Bernd Kortmann

the L 1 and L 2 varieties of English One last remark on E & F from a dialectologist’s point of view: It might be instructive to look at the morphosyntactic variation observable in present-day and historical varieties of continental West Germanic dialects. Here we find a number of features that

In: Language Dynamics and Change
Author: Peter Trudgill

just that English has been profoundly influenced by ON syntax, but also that it belongs on the North Germanic branch of the Germanic family tree, not the West Germanic: English, they say, is North Germanic. But as was noted long ago by Schmidt (1872) and Schuchardt (1868), the family tree model is

In: Language Dynamics and Change

and Norse were, at the time of contact in England, genetically and typologically very close. Proto-Germanic split into its several daughter languages around 500  BCE , and Proto-Northwest Germanic split into North and West Germanic even later. Compare Slavic languages, which split from Proto

In: Language Dynamics and Change