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Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Rila Mukherjee
Asian Review of World Histories, founded in 2013, is the official journal of the Asian Association of World Historians (AAWH). This peer-reviewed journal publishes original research articles and book reviews to advance research, teaching, and public discussion on world historical studies in or for the Asian region. It seeks the participation of those who identify themselves as "global," "world," "transregional," "comparative," "international," and "big" historians, and all others with interest in a "connected" study of the past. The journal also acts as a forum for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary conversations and for the collaboration of historians with scholars in adjoining disciplines including and with global historical scholars in all parts of the world.

Earlier issues of Asian Review of World Histories, hosted by the Asian Association of World Historians on a separate server, will be deactivated. All future volumes, together with the back volumes, will be available on Brill’s Books and Journals platform. Volumes 1-5 will be free online.

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in the Asian Review of World Histories can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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Author: George Dehner

In his magnificent 2003 book Navigating World History: Historians Create a Global Past —a combination historiographic survey, statement on the current status of the field, and guidebook to individuals and institutions on how to expand and strengthen progress and research in world history

In: Asian Review of World Histories
Author: Oskar Köhler

In the Western interpretation of history, doubts were cast on the unity of world history and its possible existence as a knowable object only when the meaning given history by the economy of salvation ceased to be believed. It became a problem even where the biblical revelation was preserved, as

In: Sacramentum Mundi Online

This paper, as a conlcusion to this special issue, presents the future work that is being carried out at NTU Singapore in collaboration with Microsoft Research and Microsoft Azure for Research. For our research team the real frontier research in world histories starts when we want to use computers to structure historical information, model historical narratives, simulate theoretical large scale hypotheses, and incent world historians to use virtual assistants and/or engage them in teamwork using social media and/or seduce them with immersive spaces to provide new learning and sharing environments, in which new things can emerge and happen: “You do not know which will be the next idea. Just repeating the same things is not enough” (Carlo Rubbia, 1984 Nobel Price in Physics, at Nanyang Technological University on January 19, 2016).

In: Asian Review of World Histories
Journal d'Histoire Economique et Sociale de l'Orient
The Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient (JESHO) publishes original research articles in Asian, Near, Middle Eastern and Mediterranean Studies across history. The journal promotes world history from Asian and Middle Eastern perspectives and it challenges scholars to integrate cultural and intellectual history with economic, social and political analysis. The editors of the journal invite both early-career and established scholars to present their explorations into new fields of research. JESHO encourages debate across disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences. Published since 1958, JESHO is the oldest and most respected journal in its field.
Please note that JESHO will not accept books for review.
Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient Podcast Listen to our new JESHO-podcast "Paolo Sartori in conversation...". Issue 1: Paolo Sartori in conversation with Princeton-historian Michael Laffan on Islam in Indonesia, global history and his new book project on identity and loyalty.

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in the Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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One of the most important landslides in recent World History has been the fall of the Soviet Union. Though its consequences are felt everywhere, once again in its long history Central or Inner Asia, given its many religious, economical, and historical backgrounds and identities, will play an important role in the formation of a new balance in Asia. It is exactly the history, literature, religion, arts, economy and politics of these Inner Asian cultures and societies that Brill's Inner Asian Library series will be dedicated to.
The peer-reviewed series aims at furthering our understanding of Inner Asia and enabling us to better cope with the problems past, present and future connected with this region.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Contacts, Comparisons, Contrasts. Early Modernity Viewed from a World-Historical Perspective
The early modern period of world history (ca. 1300-1800) was marked by a rapidly increasing level of global interaction. Between the aftermath of Mongol conquest in the East and the onset of industrialization in the West, a framework was established for new kinds of contacts and collective self-definition across an unprecedented range of human and physical geographies. The Journal of Early Modern History (JEMH), the official journal of the University of Minnesota Center for Early Modern History, is the first scholarly journal dedicated to the study of early modernity from this world-historical perspective, whether through explicitly comparative studies, or by the grouping of studies around a given thematic, chronological, or geographic frame.

JEMH invites submissions both of individual articles and of proposals for special editions (which may appear up to twice a year). For more information, consult the online Instructions for Authors, or contact the journal at jemh@umn.edu. If you have books for review, please contact the Book Review Editor at jemh_rvw@byu.edu.

Online submission: Articles for publication in Journal of Early Modern History can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

For Brill's Open Access policy, please click here.

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Editor-in-Chief: Damian Alan Pargas
Prize Announcement The Journal of Global Slavery announces an annual prize of € 500 for excellence and originality in a major work on any theme related to global slavery. More details .

The Journal of Global Slavery (JGS) aims to advance and promote a greater understanding of slavery and post-slavery from comparative, transregional, and/or global perspectives, as well as methodological and theoretical aspects of its study. It especially underscores the global and globalizing nature of slavery in world history.

As a practice in which human beings were held captive for an indefinite period of time, coerced into extremely dependent and exploitative power relationships, denied rights (including potentially rights over their labor, lives, and bodies), could be bought and sold, were vulnerable to forced relocation by various means, and forced to labor against their will, slavery in one form or another has existed in innumerable societies throughout history. JGS fosters a global view of slavery by integrating the latest scholarship from around the world and providing an interdisciplinary platform for scholars working on slavery in regions as diverse as ancient Rome, Pre-Colombian Mexico, Han dynasty China, the Ottoman Empire, the antebellum United States, and twenty-first-century Mali.

The journal also promotes a view of slavery as a globalizing force in the development of world civilizations. Global history focuses heavily upon the global movement of people, goods, and ideas, with a particular emphasis on processes of integration and divergence in the human experience. Slavery straddles all of these focal points, as it connected and integrated various societies through economic and power-based relationships, and simultaneously divided societies by class, race, ethnicity, and cultural group.

JGS is a peer-reviewed journal that publishes articles based on original research, book reviews, short notes and communications, and special issues. It especially invites articles that situate studies of slavery (whether historical or modern-day forms) in explicitly comparative, transregional, and/or global contexts. Themes may include (but are not limited to):
• the different and changing social, cultural, and legal meanings of slavery across time and space;
• the roles that slavery has played in the development of intersecting and interdependent relationships between societies throughout world history;
• comparative practices of enslavement (through warfare, indebtedness, trade, etc.);
• human trafficking and forced migration;
• transregional dialogues and the movement of ideas and practices of slavery and anti-slavery across space;
• slave cultures and cultural transfer;
• political, economic, and ideological causes and effects of slavery;
• religion and slavery;
• resistance;
• abolition, emancipation, and manumission practices from global or comparative perspectives;
• the psychological effects, memories, legacies, and representations of slave practices.

Online submission: Articles for publication in the Journal of Global Slavery can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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‘All history is world history’ – but the history of architecture and urbanism is not. It has been written from numerous biased perspectives: the history of the former colonies from that of Europe, the history of twentieth century architecture from that of modernism, the history of Central and Eastern Europe from that of the ‘West’ – and we could expand this list indefinitely. Supporting a historical approach with a historiographical angle, Brill Studies in Architectural and Urban History welcomes books that respect and restore the global dimension of architecture and urbanism, critically re-evaluate existing bodies of knowledge, and are the result of thorough research that are largely based on primary sources. The series has no geographical or temporal limitations – we’re happy to accommodate books on renaissance Italy as well as studies on South-African shanty towns, the main focus of the series being its international and critical approach.

The peer reviewed series accommodates English language scholarly monographs, collections of essays, conference proceedings, and works of reference.