. Bur was not this western-ness kept strategically by them and support by the Sultans a ‘poisoned’ mediation, that is, a pseudo-mediation whose ultimate end was their self-consecration as a different kind of zimmi near the Porte, and one hyper-active in his devouring? As we have said before, neither

In: Oriente Moderno

of divorce to allow the wife to remarry without an investigation about his fate and a waiting period. These rules on marriage and divorce were applicable to non-Muslims too, as zimmi s (Arabic: ḏimmī )in the Ḥanafī interpretation of law are equal in practically the whole of the law of property

In: Oriente Moderno

mores and customs). These populations whose rights are guaranteed by Islamic precepts, are called zimmi (Arabic, ḏimmī ). The Zimmi s were certainly not equal to Muslims: although they were allowed to live according to their beliefs and customs, they were also subjected to additional taxes

In: Oriente Moderno

ZIMMIS (NON-MUSLIMS) IN EARLY I7th CENTURY OTTOMAN JUDICIAL RECORDS THE SHARIA COURT OF ANATOLIAN KAYSERI BY RONALD C. JENNINGS (Urbana) THE ZIMMI (DHIMMI, NON-MUSLIM) POPULATION OF KAYSERI*) The zimmi (dhimmi, non-Muslim) population of Kayseri city and province in the i 6th and early i 7th

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

Abstract

By the late 17th century Nazareth was no more than a sleepy little hamlet. Within the next five decades, it emerged as an important urban centre. This change was prompted by major economic and political processes that affected the whole of Palestine. In the following I will outline the three main factors that combined to put Nazareth on the map: Europe’s growing interest in the region, and the weakness of the Ottoman Central government, with local chiefs taking advantage of both and acquiring near autonomous status.

In: Oriente Moderno

(many of whom were also of Christian origin). Thus, despite his formal designation as zimmi , found in the endowment deed, Mavrogenis behaved like any other high Ottoman official of the central government or an important Muslim provincial notable who sought to secure his property through the

In: Turkish Historical Review

JENNINGS, R. C. Studies on Ottoman social history in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries: women, zimmis and Sharia courts in Kayseri, Cyprus and Trabzon Analecta Isisiana, 39, Istanbul: Isis Press, 1999. 728pp. BETON, Emine I. & ERTEK, Tümay. Returns to education in North Cyprus ODTÜ Gelişme

enjoying protection of the Muslim ruler) and zimmi s (non-Muslim Ottoman subjects). 3 In the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the Wallachians and Moldavians’ condition across the imperial domains was closer to that of foreigners ( müsteʿmin ). As zimmi s, since the mid-sixteenth century

In: Ottoman Law of War and Peace

= daughter of; v. = veled = son of. In Ottoman documents after 1600, bn is used for Muslims and veled for zimmis. Archival sources are cited as follows: i S means Kayseri sicil number page S 6, entry 4. When a sicil from a collection other than that of Kayseri is cited the name of the city is always

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient