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two kinds of concepts pertaining to the same kind of things. But only one of the two is completely determined by exter- nal relations. Thus I conclude that the externalist picture of Ockham calls for some additions. Keywords externalism, concepts, acquisition of concepts, subordination, conventional

In: Vivarium
Author: Zeev Perelmuter

Abstract

At the beginning of Posterior Analytics 2.19 Aristotle reminds us that we cannot claim demonstrative knowledge (epistêmê apodeiktikê) unless we know immediate premisses, the archai of demonstrations. By the end of the chapter he explains why the cognitive state whereby we get to know archai must be Nous. In between, however, Aristotle describes the process of the acquisition of concepts, not immediate premisses. How should we understand this? There is a general agreement that it is Nous by means of which we acquire both premisses and concepts. I argue that this cannot be the case. Since concepts are simples while premisses are composites (predications of concepts), the two cannot be objects of the same cognitive state. I further argue that, whereas Nous is responsible for our grasp of concepts, the state Aristotle elsewhere calls non-demonstrable knowledge is the one whereby we get to know the premisses of demonstrations.

In: Phronesis
Author: Fiona N. Newell

statistical properties of the environment or through more explicit acquisition of concepts, can influence synaesthetic experiences. Of course, future work also needs to address the more fundamental questions of how synaesthetic experiences arise in the brain and why some people have synaesthesia but most do

In: Multisensory Research
Author: Yakir Levin

-linguistic. 13 Due to the close ties between non-discursive formationism and non-discursive founda- tionalism, if the former thesis is incorrect so is also the latter. But I shall not expand on this point here. 4. The Theoretical Status of Mental Concepts The acquisition of concepts requires, then, a prior

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Justin Barrett

possible. Whether exploring racism (Hirschfeld 1996), stories and rhymes (Rubin 1995), religion (Atran 2002; Boyer 2001; Guthrie 1993), practical knowledge about plants and animals (Atran 1990), or ghosts (Bering 2002), describing how non-cultural features of human minds encourage the acquisition of

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture

the suggested abstraction ›model‹. In an attempt to make my task more manageable, I start by examining acquisition of concepts that pick out entities with obvious visible similarities, e.g. tree and dog. Continuing, I examine how we learn concepts like fuel, danger or food, whose instances vary

In: Concepts and Categorization
Author: Stephen Menn

be nous . In between, however, Aristotle describes the process of the acquisition of concepts, not immediate premisses. How should we under- stand this? There is a general agreement that it is nous by means of which we acquire both premisses and concepts. I argue that this cannot be the case. Since

In: Phronesis

that it simply enables Aquinas to explain how the acquisition of concepts and cognition work. However, it does not help him to give an account of knowledge. In order to explain knowledge in the strict Aristotelian sense, it would have been necessary for Aquinas to spell out how a cognitive process

In: Vivarium

people get from one to the other. 3. Language and the acquisition of concepts How does a person progress from a (nonconceptual) rudimentary fi rst- person perspective to the full self-consciousness of a (conceptual) robust fi rst-person perspective? A baby is born with the biological equipment bestowed

In: Grazer Philosophische Studien

limits. The most obvious of these limits is a strong focus on verbal language. Francophone educational semiotics fails to think about and promote the “semiotic richness” of educational settings. Because the main point is the acquisition of concepts, every classroom activity must find its conclusion

In: Semiotics Education Experience