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, they often very readily described their personal emotions, including feelings of care about, and generated by, this place. But in telling their stories about the pool, and in their laughter, tears and pauses, the swimmers also revealed something of the ‘affective intensities’ and embodied experiences

In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
Experimental translation has been surging in popularity recently—with avant-garde translation at the combative forefront. But how to do it? How to read it?
Translator, Touretter plays on the Italian dictum traduttore, traditore—“translator, traitor”—to mobilize the affective intensity of Tourettic tics as a practical guide to making and reading avant-garde translations. It smashes the theoretical literature on the sublime from Longinus to Kant into Motherless Brooklyn, both the 1999 novel by Jonathan Lethem and its 2019 screen adaptation by Edward Norton, in order to generate out of their collision a series of models—visual, aural/oral, and kinesthetic—for avant-garde literary translation.
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clothing gather affective intensity. Rather than simply being read as a ‘fashion statement,’ the hat became a l ived example of a h aptic fashion image, evoking intense affective responses as its affective intensity builds over time. Finally, and most importantly, the piece explores the political

In: Fashion Forward
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the contrary, to reveal and exacerbate them’ (Lamarre 2015: 122). These feelings make regional media geography highly affective, because they hinge upon the experience of both proximity and distance. The danmaku interface, indeed, is a contact zone that generates such affective intensity of media

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In: Asiascape: Digital Asia
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-)texts, what it is that triggers the affective intensity between the artwork and the viewer or reader. While I wholeheartedly underwrite and adopt her endeavour, I do not think the phrase “the forms of the affects” is the most suitable formulation. Affect is not a “thing” that has a form. It is a process that

In: How to Do Things with Affects
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-)texts, what it is that triggers the affective intensity between the artwork and the viewer or reader. While I wholeheartedly underwrite and adopt her endeavour, I do not think the phrase “the forms of the affects” is the most suitable formulation. Affect is not a “thing” that has a form. It is a process that

In: How to Do Things with Affects
Author:

affective intensity that make her work rich ground for phenomenological inquiry. Approximately one year of exposure to Guðjónsdóttir’s performances and processes acts as the experiential ground for this reflection: from the première of the performance of HYPER , through conversations and practical work in

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise
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affective intensity that make her work rich ground for phenomenological inquiry. Approximately one year of exposure to Guðjónsdóttir’s performances and processes acts as the experiential ground for this reflection: from the première of the performance of HYPER , through conversations and practical work in

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise
Author:

Following Barthes, fashion theory often positions fashion as a system of signs. However, cultural studies theorists have criticized sign-based approaches to the body as ‘disembodying,’ or leaving out the lived, embodied experience of fashion as an ‘event.’ Can a fashioned body itself embody this critique in its representation? In other words, can a body, through fashion, take subversion one step past subverting normative codes of race, class, and gender, and subvert the enactment of code-reading vision itself? If so, how would it do so? Beginning with a critique of ‘vision-as-reading’ (optical) used in the semiotic and social constructionist approaches to fashion, this piece invites fashion theorists to consider fashion as not only an abstract code of meanings and signs but as an embodied event, or ‘vision-as-feeling.’ Adapting concepts of vision from film studies, this chapter outlines a new visual methodology for studying fashion by using Deleuze’s contrasting concepts of ‘optical visuality’ and ‘haptic visuality’ in order to account for a lived experience of the sensuous and affective dimensions of fashion. To explore the haptic image’s potential and enactment, the author undertook a five-year long autoethnographic study, which involved wearing the same hat every day in an academic community and watching this chapter of clothing gather affective intensity. Rather than simply being read as a ‘fashion statement,’ the hat became a lived example of a haptic fashion image, evoking intense affective responses as its affective intensity builds over time. Finally, and most importantly, the piece explores the political dimensions of using haptic visual methodology and instructs fashion scholars on how to use haptic criticism to explore fashion theory’s neglected sensory and affective dimensions.

In: Fashion Forward

, p. 139). Secondly, we are interested in what the affective intensities of the students within various assemblages produce : what are the various thresholds of affective intensities that impact the productivity of the graduates, and either constrain their intensities or extend and enhance them