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Claudia Freigang, Wiktor Mlynarski, Marc Stöhr, Rudolf Rübsamen, Jan Bennemann and Philipp Benner

Multisensory Research 26 Supplement (2013) 118 brill.com/msr Poster Presentation Perceptual ambiguity — perception and processing of spatially discordant/concordant audiovisual stimuli Jan Bennemann 1 , ∗ , Philipp Benner 2 , Claudia Freigang 1 , Wiktor Mlynarski 2 , Marc Stöhr 1 and Rudolf

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Claude Panaccio

simple and material suppositions in mental language leads to the possibility of ambiguities within human thought itself, which he—Spade—took to be at odds with what mental language is supposed to be for Ockham, namely a logically ideal language. 8 Ockham, indeed, holds that a sentence with a second

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Agnieszka Solska and Arkadiusz Rojczyk

we have conducted. The general discussion of the findings emerging from the experiment is presented in Section 5 and is followed by concluding remarks in Section 6. 2. The Sources of the Garden Path Effect 2.1. Local Ambiguities The interpreting problems encountered by

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Lucy Fife

The narrative of Rosemary’s Baby (Roman Polanski, 1968) hinges on a central hesitation between pregnancy-induced madness and the existence of Satanism. Accordingly, the monstrous element is embodied in both the real and the supernatural: Rosemary’s husband Guy (John Cassavetes) is responsible for her victimisation through rape in either explanation. However, I will argue that the inherent ambiguity of the plot makes it difficult to place him as such a figure typical to the archetypal horror binaries of normality/monster, human/inhuman. By displacing generic convention, the film complicates the issue of monstrosity, making the depiction of female experience of marriage central to the narrative and offering the possibility of the real being of greater significance than the supernatural.

Previous writing has tended to concentrate on Rosemary (Mia Farrow) and her pregnancy; this analysis centres on Guy and, through detailed consideration of Cassavetes’s performance and its placement within the mise-en-scène, demonstrates that he changes almost as much as Rosemary does. The chapter focuses on the film’s depiction of rape, during Rosemary’s nightmare and after it, in order to demonstrate how the notion of performance reveals Guy’s monstrousness and the difficulties this represents in our engagement with him.

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Peter Kanyandago

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/157254311X579622 Exchange 40 (2011) 235-256 brill.nl/exch Religion, Development and Insecurity: Looking for Root Causes in An Ambiguous Relationship Peter Kanyandago Uganda Martyrs University P O Box 5498, Kampala, Uganda pkanyandago

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Biblical Ambiguities

Metaphor, Semantics and Divine Imagery

David H. Aaron

Ancient texts are ambiguous, and the Hebrew Bible is no exception. One might even frame the history of a religion as a history of a belief system’s management of ambiguity. Applying a linguistic model, Aaron systematically examines and veritably celebrates this inherent ambiguity in order to understand God-related idioms in the Hebrew Bible, more specifically, whether a particular idiom is meant to be understood metaphorically. Aaron examines the original intent of the writers of biblical literature and suggests that one can conceptualize texts as metonyms for their authors and their historical contexts. Through an in-depth exploration of semantic theory, Aaron places metaphor on a non-binary “continuum of meaning” instead of using a limiting either/or conception of figurative speech. Aaron challenges current methodologies that dominate biblical scholarship regarding metaphor and offers original, viable alternatives to the standard approaches. This interdisciplinary project takes into consideration a broad range of issues, which point to further areas of study. Aaron’s model for gradient judgements, that is, a method for judging statements and placing them on a “continuum of meaning,” offers a new building block for biblical study and interpretation.

Please note that Biblical Ambiguities was previously published by Brill in hardback (ISBN 90 04 12032 7), still available)
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Ambiguous Subjects

Dissolution and Metamorphosis in the Postmodern Sublime

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Jennifer Wawrzinek

In the history of ideas, the aesthetic categories of the sublime and the grotesque have exerted a powerful force over the cultural imagination. Ambiguous Subjects is one of the first studies to examine the relationship between these concepts. Tracing the history of the sublime from the eighteenth century through Burke and Kant, Wawrzinek illustrates the ways in which the sublime has traditionally been privileged as an inherently masculine and imperialist mode of experience that polices and abjects the grotesque to the margins of acceptable discourse, and the way in which twentieth-century reconfigurations of the sublime increasingly enable the productive situating of these concepts within a dialogic relation as a means of instating an ethical relation to others.
This book examines the articulations of both the sublime and the grotesque in three postmodern texts. Looking at novels by Nicole Brossard and Morgan Yasbincek, and the performance work of The Women’s Circus, Wawrzinek illuminates the ways in which these writers and performers restructure the spatial and temporal parameters of the sublime in order to allow various forms of highly contingent transcendence that always necessarily remain in relation to the grotesque body. Ambiguous Subjects illustrates how the sublime and the grotesque can co-exist in a manner where each depends on and is inflected through the other, thus enabling a notion of individuality and of community as contingent, but nevertheless very real, moments in time.
Ambiguous Subjects is essential reading for anyone interested in aesthetics, continental philosophy, gender studies, literary theory, sociology and politics.
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Katajun Amirpur

place, what was meant by an Islamic government. On the contrary: since Khomeynī did not comment often and only ambiguously, many turned to his most important disciple, Motahharī. Motahharī, whom Hamid Dabashi describes as the chief ideologist of the Islamic Revolution of Iran, largely represented Nāʾīnī

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Biblical Ambiguities

Metaphor, Semantics and Divine Imagery

David H. Aaron

Biblical Ambiguities poses as its central question: When we read a passage in the Hebrew Bible, how do we know whether the passage was meant literally or metaphorically? This study argues that our assumptions as to how language works influences the way we interpret biblical texts. Drawing upon contemporary linguistic theory, Aaron seeks to place before the reader a strategy for deciphering biblical idioms within a theory of semantics, using divine imagery in the Hebrew Bible as the primary focal point. This book presents a gradient model of meaning based on Relevance Theory and the writings of Ray Jackendoff. While numerous biblical passages are considered in detail, the main test case for Aaron’s approach to meaning and metaphor is the Israelite attitude toward idols. Although biblical ideology is usually portrayed as contrasting a literalist idolatry with a more sophisticated Israelite theology, Aaron argues that policies regarding icons had less to do with theology than the politics of governance and language. Part of that critique regards common scholarly assumptions about the literal or metaphorical character of divine imagery and idols. The metaphorization or the literalization of biblical images has served as a reading strategy since ancient times, and often persists in scholarly discourse today. Perhaps as important as Aaron’s suggestion of an alternative approach to the problem of distinguishing metaphorical from literal language, is that his argument raises our consciousness of how we go about interpretive acts when writing the history of Israelite theology.

Kinberg, Leah

mutashābihāt) appears twice with the sense of “ambiguous” or “similar.”