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or dialects under study. The present paper demonstrates this point using a data set where borrowing would be expected to be a problem: the dialects of ancient Greek. It first presents a phylogenetic analysis of the Greek dialects, highlighting problems in the phylogenetic tree which may be due

In: Indo-European Linguistics
The Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic is the sole annual publication devoted exclusively to the study of Ancient Greek epic. Comprising articles selected through a process of double-blind peer review, the Yearbook provides a platform for cutting-edge, synthetic research on Ancient Greek epic from the Archaic Period to Late Antiquity (fifth century CE).
The Yearbook is online available as an electronic journal. For more information please view www.brill.com/yago.
The Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic is the sole annual publication devoted exclusively to the study of Ancient Greek epic. The Yearbook provides a platform for cutting-edge, synthetic research on Ancient Greek epic from the Archaic Period to Late Antiquity (fifth century CE). The Yearbook comprises articles through a process of double blind peer review and also includes special issues, dedicated to one particular topic. The print version is published as a book series. The journal is published online only, and as a hardback yearbook. For more information on the print version, please click here.

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Characterization in Ancient Greek Literature is the fourth volume in the series Studies in Ancient Greek Narrative. The book deals with the narratological concepts of character and characterization and explores the textual devices used for purposes of characterization by ancient Greek authors spanning a large historical period (from Homer to Heliodorus) and a variety of literary genres (epic, elegy, historiography, choral lyric, drama, oratory, philosophy, biography, and novel). The book’s aim is not only to describe these devices, but also to investigate their effects and the implications of their use for our interpretation of the texts.
Volume 4 of the Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic presents five articles on the Iliad and the Odyssey and one on the history of Homeric scholarship. Contributors look to the Ancient Near East, to medieval Japan, and to contemporary conceptual metaphor theory; they explore the interpretations of ancient readers and the contests of modern scholarship. This diverse collection will be of interest to all students and scholars of ancient Greek epic.
Editor-in-Chief: Thornton C. Lockwood
Polis (AGPT) was founded in 1977 to provide a forum for publication to scholars specializing in what was then a neglected sub-field – ancient Greek political thought. In the years since, Polis has expanded its coverage to include Hellenistic and Roman political thought. Over the years Polis evolved into a fully-fledged academic journal that publishes material of interest to those who study ancient Greek and Roman political thought broadly understood, whether they do so as classicists, ancient historians, philosophers, intellectual historians, or political scientists. Polis also welcomes articles on the reception of ancient Greek and Roman political thought in Europe, America, or elsewhere. Since its inception the journal speaks for no particular perspective or methodology and it is devoted to the publication of original papers, even though extensive literature reviews, critiques of contemporary research, and review essays are also included.

Polis publishes contributions written in English, French and German. Submissions are peer-reviewed, and an editorial decision is made on the basis of these reviews. The views and opinions expressed in peer-reviewed articles published in Polis are those of the authors and do not reflect the position of the journal.

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Volume 2 of the Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic presents seven articles. Contributors explore the poetry of Homer, Hesiod, and Empedocles, investigate the nature of formulaic language, reveal Greek tragedy’s connections with epic, and study the characters of Ganymede and Hekamede. This diverse collection will be of interest to all students and scholars of ancient Greek epic.

Contributors are: Joel P. Christensen, Xavier Gheerbrant, Ahuvia Kahane, Lynn Kozak, Bruce Louden, Sheila Murnaghan, Polyxeni Strolonga.