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Kalender Pasha (d. 1616), an Ottoman artist-cum-statesman, was a renowned paper joiner (vaṣṣāl). He assembled two albums and compiled a Falnāma (Book of Omens) for Sultan Ahmed I (r. 1603–17). Among these, only one of the albums consisted of calligraphies and images provided by the sultan himself, while the others were assembled from works chosen by Kalender, probably from his personal collection. Composed of diverse contents and for varied purposes but in nearly identical format, the albums reflect Kalender’s own style and approach to album designing. These three volumes, which have approximately identical dimensions, contain prefaces that are directly related to their contents and are all, save one, authored by Kalender himself. The prefaces, or presentation texts, addressed to Sultan Ahmed I, drew on the Safavid tradition of album prefaces, although they contextually diverge from them. They provide invaluable information on the relationship between an Ottoman album-compiler and his work, as well as on the artistic identity of Kalender. This essay introduces these particular interrelated works and attempts to analyze the prefaces in relation to the included items, their purpose, and the patron of the albums. Appendices by Wheeler M. Thackston provide the transliterations of the texts of two album prefaces, as well as translations into English.

In: Muqarnas Online
Friendship, Art and Erudition in the Network of Abraham Ortelius (1527-1598)
Erudite Eyes explores the network of the Antwerp cartographer Abraham Ortelius (1527-1598), a veritable trading zone of art and erudition. Populated by such luminaries as Pieter Bruegel, Joris Hoefnagel, Justus Lipsius and Benedictus Arias Montanus, among others, this vibrant antiquarian culture yielded new knowledge about local antiquities and distant civilizations, and offered a framework for articulating art and artistic practice. These fruitful exchanges, undertaken in a spirit of friendship and collaboration, are all the more astonishing when seen against the backdrop of the ongoing wars. Based on a close reading of early modern letters, alba amicorum, printed books, manuscripts and artworks, this book situates Netherlandish art and culture between Bruegel and Rubens in a European perspective.

; sociocultural meaning is secondary ( Chalmers 1996 , p. 15). Although a chapter or two, or a global timeline may have been added to art history texts, in terms of both demographic and ethical realities, the necessary revolution is far from complete. For example, if the world’s population of nearly 5 billion

In: Art, Culture, and Pedagogy

, and the arts. Books about art need to be examined for manifestations of bias; particularly for stereotyping, omissions, and biased language usage. No-one must think of themselves as more “civilized” than others. For example, if we look at the tables of contents in many general art history texts

In: Art, Culture, and Pedagogy

historical. A number of queer art history texts have been published over recent years (among them are Petry, 2004; Lord & Meyer, 2012 ; Getsby, 2016 ), and exhibitions have been held in Britain in 2017 to coincide with the repeal of the Sexual Offences Act of 1967 ( Barlow, 2017 ; Pilcher, 2017 , ‘Coming

In: Art, Culture, and Pedagogy

’s art education. Introduction In a previous paper on the origins of racism in Western art education ( Chalmers, 1992 ) I presented, as an example of a nineteenth-century ethno- and ego-centric art educator, George Gustavus Zerffi. In that paper I quoted from Zerffi’s influential art history text

In: Art, Culture, and Pedagogy

now be labelled a racist bigot. In his influential nineteenth-century art history text, this Victorian imperialist, like the influential Sir Kenneth Clark (1969) in our own recent past, saw civilization as essentially and peculiarly Western. Zerffi called the White Aryan race “the crowning product

In: Art, Culture, and Pedagogy

introductory or first words of the document, “the one who does the work of Christ” (“Qui res Christi gerit”), – although their content is religious, as expected – are a quote from an art-history text, Giorgio Vasari’s Lives ( Le vite ) published in 1550, rather than a historical or theological work. The pope

In: Great Immortality

(1876) had considerable impact on art education thinking. He prepared the art history text used in the National Art Training Schools. His Manual of the Historical Development of Art was dedicated to Poynter, the Director of the Art Training Schools at South Kensington. Poynter ( Poynter & Head, 1885

In: Art, Culture, and Pedagogy

history text that I have seen includes this work, as it surely should. Instead, it is somewhat disparagingly termed as an “ancestor cult,” as if future archaeologists should find the heads at Mount Rushmore and take them to be evidence of a primitive and nascent culture, to say nothing of the Abrahamic

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas