The EAAA Monograph Series, entitled European Studies in Asian Art and Archaeology aims to publish in-depth, peer-reviewed scholarly contributions on topics relevant to Asian Art and Archaeology that treat these in a wider Asian context. The series endeavors to analyze and interpret the artistic and cultural heritage of ancient, modern and contemporary social realities in Asian societies, and to contribute in this way to a deeper understanding of the cultural, philosophical, political, sociological, religious and ideological values of Asia as a whole. The EAAA Series' goal is to publish innovative research that will have a lasting impact by opening new research questions, which will help trace new theoretical and methodological pathways in the field of art history.
What is Protestant Art? presents an introduction to Protestant visual culture from the Reformation to the present. Examining historical images as evidence of changing practices and attitudes, Andrew T. Coates explores three major themes in the history of Protestant visual culture: 1) the religious work of images, 2) the relationship between word and image, 3) the power of the Bible and its visual representation. The book analyses images such as prints, paintings, maps of the ‘Holy Land,’ and Bible illustrations to demonstrate the broad range of images that could be classified as Protestant ‘art.’ This work argues that the variety of images and visual practices throughout Protestant history might better be described by the term ‘visual culture’ than ‘art.’
Taking a Postcolonial, Aesthetic Turn
Art Therapy in Australia: Taking a Postcolonial, Aesthetic Turn explores and enacts established and emergent art therapy histories, narratives and practices in the specific postcolonial context of contemporary Australia. It is the first published book to attempt to map this terrain. In doing so, the book aims to document important aspects of art therapy in Australia, including how Australian approaches both reiterate and challenge the dominant discourse of art therapy. This book is as much a performance as an account of the potential of art therapy to honour alterity, illuminate possibilities and bear witness to the intrapsychic, relational and social realms. The book offers a selective window into the rambling assemblage that is art therapy in the ‘Great Southern Land’.

Contributors are: Jan Allen, Bronwyn Davies, Claire Edwards, Nicolette Eisdell, Patricia Fenner, John Henzell, Pam Johnston, Lynn Kapitan, Carmen Lawson, Sheridan Linnell, Tarquam McKenna, Michelle Moss, Suzanne Perry, Josephine Pretorius, Jean Rumbold, Victoria Schnaedelbach, Lilian Tan, Jody Thomson, Jill Westwood, Amanda Woodford, and Davina Woods.