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Author: Kirsten Ainley

what these principles mean in practice for the most vulnerable civilians at risk of mass atrocity crimes. 1 The brutality of today’s armed conflicts and the utter lack of respect for the fundamental rules of international humanitarian law threaten to unravel 150 years of achievements, and risks

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

brutal rule or opened productive diplomatic channels to any of them. There are many examples in recent decades of political and military leaders, saddled with domestic or international arrest warrants, ultimately losing power and thus greatly enabling the end of atrocity crimes (genocide, crimes against

In: Contemporary Issues Facing the International Criminal Court

impunity in Myanmar. Despite the contested labelling, 4 investigating the allegations of atrocity crimes is essential for national reconciliation and to restore ‘international legality and the faith of the world community in the triumph of justice and reason’—as stressed by the Russian envoy during a

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Michael Barnett

Global Responsibility to Protect 2 (2010) 307–309 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI 10.1163/187598410X500417 brill.nl/gr2p On Gareth Evans, Th e Responsibility to Protect: Ending Mass Atrocity Crimes Once and For All Michael Barnett University of Minnesota mbarnett@umn.edu Th e

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Chris Brown

in International Law (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008). On Gareth Evans, Th e Responsibility to Protect: Ending Mass Atrocity Crimes Once and For All Chris Brown * London School of Economics & Political Science C.J.Brown@lse.ac.uk Gareth Evans has written an excellent guidebook to the

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Phil Orchard

abuses, inside and outside of armed conflicts, with a particular focus on mass atrocity crimes – genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing.’ A critical issue for human protection, however, is how the international community should respond to people who are forcibly displaced due

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Orchard Phil

abuses, inside and outside of armed conflicts, with a particular focus on mass atrocity crimes – genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing.’ A critical issue for human protection, however, is how the international community should respond to people who are forcibly displaced due

In: Regionalism and Human Protection

In 2005, at the United Nations World Summit, states agreed on the need to protect populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity: to halt these crimes and protect people at-risk. Since then, the focus has been more on how to respond to mass atrocity crimes

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

Since the principle of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) was adopted at the 2005 World Summit, the international community has mainly looked to the UN Security Council to respond to situations at imminent risk of, or experiencing, atrocity crimes. On the contrary, little attention has been

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Alex J. Bellamy

The Asia Pacific has accomplished much in a short space of time. Most impressively, over the past four decades it has experienced a rapid and dramatic decline in the incidence of atrocity crimes. Over a short time, the so-called “East Asian Peace” has transformed the region from one of the

In: Global Responsibility to Protect