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Attitudes toward Human Rights

Modal and Individual Personalities in Taiwan

Jeffrey J. Guo and Meei-Ying Kao

. Second, human rights are universal values, and Taiwanese people are concerned with maintaining the collective mainstream. We hoped to find out more regarding attitudes toward human rights among different personality types. Third, according to the theories and studies cited earlier, collective, culturally

Jaco S. Dreyer, Hendrik J.C. Pieterse and Johannes A. Van Der Ven

ATTITUDES TOWARDS HUMAN RIGHTS AMONG SOUTH AFRICAN YOUTH JOHANNES A VAN DER VEN, JACO S DREYER & HENDRIK J C PIETERSE Abstract In this article we examine the attitudes towards human rights of a group of 538 Grade 11 students from Anglican and Catholic church-affiliated schools in the

HENDRIR J C Pieterse, Jaco S Dreyer and Johannes A Van Der Ven

ATTITUDES TOWARDS HUMAN RIGHTS AMONG SOUTH AFRICAN YOUTH JOHANNES A VAN DER VEN, JACO S DREYER & HENDRIK J C PIETERSE Abstract In this article we examine the attitudes towards human rights of a group of 538 Grade 11 students from Anglican and Catholic church-affiliated schools in the

Johannes A. Van Der Ven, Hendrik J.C. Pieterse and Jaco S. Dreyer

SOCIAL LOCATION OF ATTITUDES TOWARDS HUMAN RIGHTS AMONG SOUTH AFRICAN YOUTH JOHANNES A VAN DER VEN, JACO S DREYER & HENDRIK J C PIETERSE Abstract In the previous article we inquired into the attitudes towards human rights of a group of 538 Grade 11 students in Anglican and Catholic church

HENDRIK J C Pieterse, Jaco S Dreyer and Johannes A Van Der Ven

SOCIAL LOCATION OF ATTITUDES TOWARDS HUMAN RIGHTS AMONG SOUTH AFRICAN YOUTH JOHANNES A VAN DER VEN, JACO S DREYER & HENDRIK J C PIETERSE Abstract In the previous article we inquired into the attitudes towards human rights of a group of 538 Grade 11 students in Anglican and Catholic church

Series:

Edited by Hans-Georg Ziebertz and Johannes A. van der Ven

This volume is about the impact of religion (beliefs and practices) on attitudes towards human rights of the first, second and third generation. The first four papers about the impact of Lutheranism, Calvinism, Catholicism and Islam are historical and theoretical of character. The six other papers are based on empirical research in England and Wales, Germany, Turkey, India, Norway and on comparative empirical research in six North-West European countries. From both groups of articles it appears that ‘the’ impact of religion does not exist. In varying historical periods and contexts various religions, c.q. religious denominations, have various effects on attitudes towards human rights, i.e. positive effects (+), ambivalent effects (±), no effects (0), and negative effects (−).

Contributors include: Francis-Vincent Anthony, Pal Ketil Botvar, Selim Eren, Leslie Francis, Üzejir Ok, Ruud Peters, Marion Reindl, Mandy Robbins, Rik Torfs, Johannes (Hans) van der Ven, John Witte Jr., Hans-Georg Ziebertz

Hendrik J.C. Pieterse, Johannes A. Van Der Ven and Jaco S. Dreyer

among Grade 11 students in the Johannesburg/ Pretoria region is investigated, and questions are posed as to the role belief in God plays in the formation of their attitudes towards human rights. Funda- mental aspects of the relationship between belief in God and human rights are dealt with, students

Series:

Johannes A. van der Ven

The relation between religion and human rights is a contested one, as they appear to compete with one another. Religion is often considered to represent a tradition of heteronomy and subordination in premodern times. Human rights emerged from early modern and modern times and stand for principles like human dignity, autonomy, equality. The first question in this book is how to define religion, its meaning, functions and structures, and how to study it. The second question is how to understand religion from its relation with human rights in such a way that justice is done to both religion and human rights. These questions are dealt with using a historical and systematic approach. The third question is what the impact of religion might be on attitudes towards human rights, i.e. human rights culture. For an answer, empirical research is reported among about 1000 students, Christians, Muslims, and nonreligious, at the end of secondary and the beginning of tertiary education in the Netherlands.