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This chapter intends to search for a balance between individual freedom and flourishing community as two interrelated dimensions of human rights. Such a balance can perhaps be better explored in the East Asian context of cultural development than the Western context. The balance is related to the

In: Confucianism and Reflexive Modernity
Bringing Community back to Human Rights in the Age of Global Risk Society
Confucianism and Reflexive Modernity offers an excellent example of a dialogue between East and West by linking post-Confucian developments in East Asia to a Western idea of reflexive modernity originally proposed by Ulrich Beck, Anthony Giddens, and Scott Lash in 1994. The author makes a sharp confrontation with the paradigm of Asian Value Debate led by Lee Kwan-Yew and defends a balance between individual empowerment and flourishing community for human rights, basically in line with Juergen Habermas, but in the context of global risk society, particularly from an enlightened perspective of Confucianism. The book is distinguished by sophisticated theoretical reflection, comparative reasoning, and solid empirical argument concerning Asian identity in transformation and the aspects of reflexive modernity in East Asia.

] subordinate (3). [If] dukes and kings can hold on to it, the ten thousand things will bin 宾 [guest, to comply] of their own accord (4). Heaven and earth [will] interact to drop sweet dew. The people cannot order it and it will self-balance (5). [As] zhi 制 [manufacture, process, carve] begins, there are

In: The Annotated Critical Laozi

which have] not enough in order to enrich [that which, those who] have surplus.” The regulatory laws of nature are not like this; they take from what is abundant and use it to compensate what is not sufficient, and thereby maintain a principle of balancing according to the mean. The rules and laws of

In: The Annotated Critical Laozi

individual empowerment at the cost of community consideration. I am interested in interpreting Confucianism not just as a kind of communitarianism in the conventional sense, but as representing a balanced and thus reflexive approach to human rights. The key component of this is balance and moderation, and

In: Confucianism and Reflexive Modernity

[ Discourses Weighed in the Balance ] has “堯何等力?”.

In: The Annotated Critical Laozi

shi 施 [to carry out, scattered] means to follow an irregular course.’ According to Ding Gongzhu 丁公著 (d. 826), it should be pronounced the same way as yi 迤 [winding, walk off a path]. In the chapter Qi su 齐俗 [ Balancing Customs ] of the Huainanzi 淮南子 [ Writings of Master Huainan ] it says

In: The Annotated Critical Laozi

is utmost jing 精 [essence, semen, seminal energy]. [It] screams all day but does not get sha 嗄 [hoarse]” in Chapter 55 describe the vigor and balance of an infant’s vital energy. In the context of the present chapter however, infancy refers to a horizon which can only be attained through self

In: The Annotated Critical Laozi

rights ( Chapters Two and Four ), the Confucian focus on balance ( Chapter Three ), and the dual dimensions of human rights communities (Chapter Five ). This chapter begins by clarifying two Confucian trajectories of development: The first is authoritarian, and the second is participatory. The chapter

In: Confucianism and Reflexive Modernity

balance between individual freedom and community development. An important question in this chapter is how to nurture a culturally-sensitive approach to human rights, embracing individuality and sociality as two dimensions of human life (Muzaffar, 1996 ; Yeon, 1996 ). This is why we have paid special

In: Confucianism and Reflexive Modernity