Search Results

: Cities Alive: 11th Annual Green Roof & Wall Conference . San Francisco, CA . Broennimann O , Treier UA , Müller‐Schärer H , Thuiller W , Peterson AT , Guisan A . 2007 . Evidence of climatic niche shift during biological invasion . Ecol Lett . 10 : 701 – 709 . Butler C

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

in the Middle East and its impact on the local arthropod fauna . Biological Invasions 12 : 1825 – 1837 . Walker K.L. 2006 . Impact of the little fire ant, Wasmannia auropunctata , on native forest ants in Gabon . Biotropica 38 : 666 – 673 . Walsh P.D. , Henschel P. , Abernethy K

In: Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews
Authors: Timofeev and Selifonova

EUPHAUSIID LARVAE IN THE BALLAST WATERS OF COMMERCIAL SHIPS: EVIDENCE FOR A POSSIBILITY FOR BIOLOGICAL INVASION BY S. F. TIMOFEEV 1 ) and Z H . P. SELIFONOVA 2 ) 1 ) Murmansk Marine Biological Institute, Vladimirskaya str. 17, Murmansk 183010, Russia 2 ) Southern Scientific Center, Chekhov str

In: Crustaceana

Biological invasions are considered to be a major threat to most ecosystems (Lockwood et al., 2012 ). Like many other groups amphibians and reptiles have been experiencing declines or extinctions after the introduction of alien species (Martin and Murray, 2010 ; Ficetola et al., 2011 ). They

In: Amphibia-Reptilia

native species Bursaphelenchus mucronatus by an alien species Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Nematoda: Aphelenchida: Aphelenchoididae): a case of successful invasion . Biological Invasions 11 , 205 - 213 . de Guiran G. Bruguier N. ( 1989 ). Hybridization and phylogeny of the

In: Nematology

high-risk pathways of biological invasions, carrying forest insects and pathogens into new environments (Evans et al ., 1996 ; Tkacz, 2002 ). Many Bursaphelenchus species, including the PWN, have been routinely intercepted in packaging and wood products in several countries, e.g ., Austria

In: Nematology

Strumigenys silvestrii is a tiny dacetine ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Dacetini), apparently from South America, that has spread to the southern US and the West Indies. Strumigenys silvestrii has recently been found for the first time in the Old World, from the island of Madeira, mainland Portugal, and Macau. Here, we document new distributional records and the geographic spread of S. silvestrii. We compiled and mapped 67 site records of S. silvestrii. We documented the earliest known S. silvestrii records for 20 geographic areas (countries, major islands, and US states), including four areas for which we found no previously published records: Georgia (US), Grenada, Nevis, and St. Vincent. Strumigenys silvestrii is the only New World dacetine ant that has been recorded in the Old World. The distribution of its closest relatives and of known S. silvestrii specimen records supports the hypothesis that S. silvestrii is native to South America. Throughout its New World range (South America, the West Indies, and the southern US), many S. silvestrii records are from undisturbed forest habitats (usually indicative of a native species), but are very recent (usually indicative of a newly arrived exotic species).

In: Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews

successful biological invasions: the case of a recent Lessepsian migrant . Biology letters , 3 : 541 – 5 . Golani D , Ritte U . 1999 . Genetic relationship in goatfishes (Mullidae : Perciformes) of the Red Sea and the Mediterranean, with remarks on Suez Canal migrants* . Sci Mar. 63 : 129

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

Pyramica hexamera is a tiny predatory ant that feeds on minute soil arthropods. Originally from East Asia, P. hexamera has been recently introduced to North America, apparently through human commerce. Here we document the known range of P. hexamera in Asia and the New World. We compiled and mapped 73 site records of P. hexamera, all from East Asia and the southeastern US. In Asia, P. hexamera records range from 21.9°N to 36.4°N (earliest date and number of sites in parentheses) in Japan (1949; 25), South Korea (1982; 2), and Taiwan (1992; 6). In the US, P. hexamera records range from 28.6°N to 34.3°N: in Florida (1987; 2), Louisiana (1987; 5), Mississippi (2003; 32), and Alabama (2007; 1). Pyramica hexamera is reported for the first time from Alabama.

In: Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews

: 384-397. Bar (Kutiel), P., Cohen, O., Shoshany, M. 2004. Invasion rate of the alien species Acacia saligna within coastal sand dune habitats in Israel. Isr. J. Plant Sci. 52: 115-124. Born, W., Rauschmayer, F., Brauer, I. 2005. Economic evaluation of biological invasions—a survey. Ecol

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution