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oceanic and blue humanities literary eco-criticism, I seek in this essay to bring a literary and theoretical history of the oceans into contact with broader ideas of compassion. 1 My conception of compassion emerges primarily through literary history, and in particular through the genre of the novel

In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
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What is the ocean’s role in human and planetary history? How have writers, sailors, painters, scientists, historians, and philosophers from across time and space poetically envisioned the oceans and depicted human entanglements with the sea? In order to answer these questions, Søren Frank covers an impressive range of material in A Poetic History of the Oceans: Greek, Roman and Biblical texts, an Icelandic Saga, Shakespearean drama, Jens Munk’s logbook, 19th century-writers such as James Fenimore Cooper, Herman Melville, Jules Michelet, Victor Hugo, Jules Verne, Jonas Lie, and Joseph Conrad as well as their 20th and 21st century-heirs like J. G. Ballard, Jens Bjørneboe, and Siri Ranva Hjelm Jacobsen.
A Poetic History of the Oceans promotes what Frank labels an amphibian comparative literature and mobilises recent theoretical concepts and methodological developments in Blue Humanities, Blue Ecology, and New Materialism to shed new light on well-known texts and introduce readers to important, but lesser-known Scandinavian literary engagements with the sea.
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as a core theme in literary theory, ecocriticism, and the environmental humanities, giving rise to a new interdisciplinary field of study called the “blue humanities” (Gillis 2013). This renewed interest in the sea is beginning to find resonance within the field of Japanese studies, as illustrated by

In: Journal of Religion in Japan
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focus on Ballard and Jacobsen). The reader familiar with the field of Blue Humanities will recognize some of the above names, but probably not all of them. Blue Humanities, Oceanic Studies, Maritime History, as well as the other disciplinary labels employed to describe the history of human

Open Access
In: A Poetic History of the Oceans

Smith and Steve Mentz (2020: 1) point out, some (white, Global North) scholarship in the recent “oceanic turns” and “blue humanities” risks re-iterating “problematic cultural fantasies” of conquests into ‘uncharted’ waters, neglecting or appropriating the Indigenous epistemologies of those who, as

Open Access
In: Studies in World Cinema
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humanities” that is “appreciative of the scholarship on blue humanities and critical ocean studies,” and in which “Ice’s composition, volume and the multiple relationships that sustain with human and non-human actors are essential ingredients.” “Geopolitics and the Ice Humanities: Elemental, Metaphorical and

In: Postcolonial Literatures of Climate Change
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poetics more than a century before Steve Mentz elevated them to keywords in Blue Humanities. With Haiene , my analysis suggested how Jens Bjørneboe emerges as a worthy Scandinavian heir to Conrad. And with Havbrevene , we saw how Siri Ranva Hjelm Jacobsen innovatively intervenes in a global discourse on

Open Access
In: A Poetic History of the Oceans

islands of Iceland and Ireland, we suggest that continued critical attention to the lived reality on our terraqueous globe—as witnessed in the ongoing development of Oceanic studies and Blue Humanities for instance—points to the need for more comparative histories of peripheral and semi-peripheral islands

In: Iceland – Ireland

. Gillis , John R. “ The Blue Humanities: In Studying the Sea, We are Returning to Our Beginnings .” Humanities 34: 3 ( 2013 ), Web. 9 Mar. 2017 . Gregory , Derek . “ Edward Said’s Imaginative Geographies .” In Thinking Space , eds. Mike Crang and Nigel Thrift

In: Ultraminor World Literatures

roadsides, and the sea. Steve Mentz’s ‘Is Compassion an Oceanic Feeling?’ comes out of his engagement in the ‘Blue Humanities’ (or ‘blue cultural studies’). Adopting a deliberately fluid interdisciplinarity, he considers the possibility of an ‘oceanic compassion’ as an embodied and companionate version of

In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society