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Jörg Sonntag

The Carmina Burana and later the Codex Manesse repeatedly depict people playing board games. Besides checkers and nine men's morris, which was popular among all classes and is documented in Europe in many variants (three men's morris, wheel mill, and the mill game, among others) since the Bronze

Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt) and Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

[German version] Attested since the 2nd half of the 4th millennium, board games were used as a pastime but also for divination purposes ( Divination; in conjunction with models of the liver [3]). The playing boards of 5 × 4 squares were made from wood (carved or with coloured inlays), stone

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Aleksandra Mochocka

cd Project Red. As such, it seems to exist on the margins of both literature and digital media. It is also a part of a wider trend: between 2010 and 2016, Polish studios released eight other board games which were marketed pointedly as adaptations of or variations on Polish popular literature. 2

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Alex de Voogt, Nathan Epstein and Laurie Linders

with relation to memory or problem-solving strategy. It still seems without dispute that changing tasks and experiments so that they are culturally appropriate is both necessary for behavioral experiments (Rogoff et al., 1984 : 539) and for studies on board games expertise (de Voogt, 2002 ). While

see Board games...

see  Abacus; see  Board games...

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Wolfgang Decker and Michael Herb

This two-volume work is a comprehensive collection of the pictorial sources for sport in Pharaonic Egypt. Adopting a broad definition of sport, its scope embraces relevant cultic scenes as well as archery, charioteering and horsemanship, hunting, wrestling, open-air games and board games, acrobatics, dancing and water sports.
Over 2,000 documents are given detailed descriptions, with systematic annotations relating to the place, date and content of the documents, as well as the most important secondary literature. The hieroglyphic captions are given in transcription and translation. A representative selection of the pictorial documents, accounting for approximately half of the total material, is presented in the illustrated volume. Accompanying maps classify the material by subject area with indications of their topographical distribution and chronological proximity.
The publication of this corpus of materials makes available for the first time the complete pictorial tradition of a great, ancient sporting culture, the intention being to stimulate and intensify research in these fields by the provision of the basic materials.
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Wolfgang Decker and Michael Herb

This two-volume work is a comprehensive collection of the pictorial sources for sport in Pharaonic Egypt. Adopting a broad definition of sport, its scope embraces relevant cultic scenes as well as archery, charioteering and horsemanship, hunting, wrestling, open-air games and board games, acrobatics, dancing and water sports.
Over 2,000 documents are given detailed descriptions, with systematic annotations relating to the place, date and content of the documents, as well as the most important secondary literature. The hieroglyphic captions are given in transcription and translation. A representative selection of the pictorial documents, accounting for approximately half of the total material, is presented in the illustrated volume. Accompanying maps classify the material by subject area with indications of their topographical distribution and chronological proximity.
The publication of this corpus of materials makes available for the first time the complete pictorial tradition of a great, ancient sporting culture, the intention being to stimulate and intensify research in these fields by the provision of the basic materials.
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Bildatlas zum Sport im alten Ägypten (2 vols)

Corpus der bildlichen Quellen zu Leibesübungen, Spiel, Jagd, Tanz und verwandten Themen

Wolfgang Decker and Michael Herb

This two-volume work is a comprehensive collection of the pictorial sources for sport in Pharaonic Egypt. Adopting a broad definition of sport, its scope embraces relevant cultic scenes as well as archery, charioteering and horsemanship, hunting, wrestling, open-air games and board games, acrobatics, dancing and water sports.
Over 2,000 documents are given detailed descriptions, with systematic annotations relating to the place, date and content of the documents, as well as the most important secondary literature. The hieroglyphic captions are given in transcription and translation. A representative selection of the pictorial documents, accounting for approximately half of the total material, is presented in the illustrated volume. Accompanying maps classify the material by subject area with indications of their topographical distribution and chronological proximity.
The publication of this corpus of materials makes available for the first time the complete pictorial tradition of a great, ancient sporting culture, the intention being to stimulate and intensify research in these fields by the provision of the basic materials.