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The Ecological Significance of Brain Plasticity Florence Chiew Abstract This chapter explores the concept of neuroplasticity alongside anthropologist Gregory Bateson’s work on the ecology of mind. In the last three decades, a growth of research areas in neuroscience has drawn attention to

In: Relational Concepts in Medicine
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This chapter explores the concept of neuroplasticity alongside anthropologist Gregory Bateson’s work on the ecology of mind. In the last three decades, a growth of research areas in neuroscience has drawn attention to the role of social interactions in organising brain circuitry. Some of the most compelling findings in this area of study are documenting the transformative potential of brain plasticity and its broader implications for learning, education and rehabilitation programs. However, most researchers working in this area take the brain or the psychology of an individual to be a self-evident entity lodged within an inner, subjective world that responds to changes in an external environment. Reading across disciplinary registers, Bateson’s ecological approach to mental processes challenges this individualistic model of the brain. He proposes a relational notion of learning that reconceptualises the assumption that an idea, a thought, or a habit originates from an individual. In Bateson’s account, mental processes are shaped by prevailing social and ecological circumstances, and these circumstances are themselves informed by specific historical contexts. This view of the biosphere as a selforganising system challenges dualistic depictions of mind and matter, individual and environment, self and system. This chapter explores how an ecological perspective of motivation recasts conventionally individualistic assumptions of agency.

In: Relational Concepts in Medicine

Abstract

Sensory Substitution Devices (SSDs) are typically used to restore functionality of a sensory modality that has been lost, like vision for the blind, by recruiting another sensory modality such as touch or audition. Sensory substitution has given rise to many debates in psychology, neuroscience and philosophy regarding the nature of experience when using SSDs. Questions first arose as to whether the experience of sensory substitution is represented by the substituted information, the substituting information, or a multisensory combination of the two. More recently, parallels have been drawn between sensory substitution and synaesthesia, a rare condition in which individuals involuntarily experience a percept in one sensory or cognitive pathway when another one is stimulated. Here, we explore the efficacy of understanding sensory substitution as a form of ‘artificial synaesthesia’. We identify several problems with previous suggestions for a link between these two phenomena. Furthermore, we find that sensory substitution does not fulfil the essential criteria that characterise synaesthesia. We conclude that sensory substitution and synaesthesia are independent of each other and thus, the ‘artificial synaesthesia’ view of sensory substitution should be rejected.

In: Multisensory Research
Plasticity, Embodiment, and the Unclosed Circle
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In her new book Art and the Brain: Plasticity, Embodiment and the Unclosed Circle, Amy Ione offers a profound assessment of our ever-evolving view of the biological brain as it pertains to embodied human experience. She deftly takes the reader from Deep History into our current worldview by surveying the range of nascent responses to perception, thoughts and feelings that have bred paradigmatic changes and led to contemporary research modalities. Interweaving carefully chosen illustrations with the emerging ideas of brain function that define various time periods reinforces a multidisciplinary framework connecting neurological research, theories of mind, art investigations, and intergenerational cultural practices.
The book will serve as a foundation for future investigations of neuroscience, art, and the humanities.
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Brain Sciences, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel Abstract Motherhood is associated with different forms of physiological alterations including transient hor- monal changes and brain plasticity. The underlying impact of these changes on the emergence of maternal behaviors and sensory processing

In: Multisensory Research

Multisensory Research Group, Universidad Pompeu Fabra de Barcelona, Spain 2 Bellvitge Research Biomedical Institute (IDIBELL), Cognition and Brain Plasticity Unit, Spain 3 Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Spain Abstract In everyday life conversations, speakers often accompany verbal

In: Multisensory Research

disorder, 477 Autism-Spectrum Quotient, 477 autism-spectrum quotient, 663 B balance, 261 biological motion, 493 bistability, 763 body, 493 body ownership, 441 body representation, 323 brain plasticity, 297 C congruency, 455 congruency effect, 113 consensuality principle, 785

In: Multisensory Research

greatest effect in the F3 offspring of transgenerationally stressed mothers. Stress in F2 mothers affected the microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns of the miR-200 family in brain and uterus which regulates pathways related to brain plasticity and parturition, respectively, and also increased placental

In: Book of Abstracts of the 66th Annual Meeting of the European Association for Animal Production

83 Allergic Body Michelle Jamieson The Ecological Significance of Brain Plasticity 91 Florence Chiew Part 5 Healthcare and Society The Implications of e-Health as a Universal Problem 103 Solution Frame Blaž Ilc

In: Relational Concepts in Medicine
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(University of East Anglia, uk) VOLUME 47 The titles published in this series are listed at brill.com/cla <UN> Art and the Brain Plasticity, Embodiment, and the Unclosed Circle By Amy Ione LEIDEN | BOSTON <UN> Cover illustration: “Art and the Brain” by Amy Ione, 2016. Library of Congress Cataloging

In: Art and the Brain