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. Breeding success and its correlation with nest-site characteristics: a study of a Griffon Vulture colony in Gamla , Israel. J Raptor Res. 51 : 136 – 144 . Gill FB , Wolf LL . 1977 . Nonrandom foraging by sunbirds in a patchy environment . Ecology 58 : 1284 – 1296 . Hatzofe

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

Ecstatic display calls of the Adélie penguin honestly predict male condition and breeding success Emma J. Marks 1,3) , Allen G. Rodrigo 1) & Dianne H. Brunton 2) ( 1 The Bioinformatics Institute, University of Auckland, P.O. Box 92019, Auckland, New Zealand; 2 Ecology and Conservation Group

In: Behaviour
Authors: Adiv Gal, David Saltz, and Uzi Motro

the present work, we tried to learn if food limitation during the nestling-period (i.e. from hatching to fledging) has an effect on the breeding success of Lesser Kestrels in two Israeli colonies, Alona and Jerusalem. This was done by comparing breeding success of nests that were artificially

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

( Ficedula albicollis ) use public information of the breeding success of other individuals with regard to their migration decisions. In their experimental study, the birds monitored the current reproductive success of others, and their probability of emigration increased both when local offspring quantity

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

MOBBING BEHAVIOUR, NEST EXPOSURE, AND BREEDING SUCCESS IN THE AMERICAN ROBIN by IAN G. MCLEAN, JAMES N. M. SMITH and K. GLENNA STEWART1) (Dept. of Zoology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 1, New Zealand; Dept. of Zoology, University of British Columbia, 6270 University Boulevard

In: Behaviour

., Schmidt, KaH., wiltschko, w. 2005. pair bond and breeding success in blue Tits Parus caeruleus and great tits Parus major. Ibis 147: 92–108. Perrins, c.M., birkhead, T.R. 1983. Avian ecology. blackie, glasgow. Seel, D.c. 1968a. breeding season of the house sparrow and tree sparrow Passer spp

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

, and separately for both male and female. Breeding success and pair bond duration of pairs was manipulated. After separation from the mate for up to 60 days the subject (female or male) was allowed to court to a new mate for 4 hours. Then the subject was given a choice between the old and the new mate

In: Behaviour

; Sorato et al., 2016; Nelson-Flower et al., 2018) or are predominately females (Komdeur et al., 1997; Berg, 2004). The impact that helpers have on the reproductive pair’s breeding success varies among species (Brown, 1987; Cockburn, 1998; Koenig et al., 2016). Moreover, within the same species, helpers

In: Behaviour

nest boxes defended in uenced total breeding success mainly in the years when male feeding frequency was less important for breeding success per nest. A lower proportion of Cy-males than T- or C-males still held at least a nest box in 1999, three years after they were implanted. As a result, 1

In: Behaviour

breeding success. Since polygyny occurs frequently in our nest box colonies in Belgium (PINXTEN et al., 1989a, b; PINXTEN & EENS 1990), resulting in a high variation in breeding success between males, the starl- ing is a particularly appropriate subject for a study of this kind. In the second part of this

In: Behaviour