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Svetlana Malysheva and Cвeтлaнa Maлышeвa

For several decades, the mass burial practices in Soviet Russia were strongly linked with Soviet ideology and the practices of everyday life. Soviet military and state officials intentionally and unintentionally used mass graves as a political and ideological tool. Soviet Russian and Soviet authorities noted mass graves in documents and in public discourse, and couched them in a “figure of silence.” Places of mass burials were given meaning and characterized as systems of ideological representation and the binary oppositions of “ours” versus “foreign.” This article examines the practice of mass burials from the 1920s to the 1940s and how it shaped and influenced Soviet Russian and Soviet ideological constructs.

Chaniotis, A., Corsten, T., Stroud, R.S. and Tybout, R.A.

⇐ PreviousBrowse ⇑Next ⇒ Entry In a collection of sources for the cult of Homonoia on Kos, D.Bosnakis, K.Hallof, art.cit. (cf. SEG 55 919) 241, mention two unpublished boundary stones of the burial grounds of the Homonoistai (3rd cent. A.D.). Ed.pr. D.Bosnakis, Ἀνέκδοτες ἐπιγραφὲς τῆς Κῶ. Ἐπιτύμβια

Irina Zasetskaya

ON THE CHRONOLOGY OF EAGLE-HEAD BUCKLES FROM THE NECROPOLIS OF BOSPORUS AND SOUTH-CRIMEAN BURIAL-GROUNDS OF THE EARLY MEDIEVAL PERIOD (6 TH - EARLY 7 TH CENTURIES AD) IRINA P. ZASETSKAYA Among the antiquities of the Early Medieval Crimea a special place is occupied by so-called eagle

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Andreas Stynen

funeral processions for six months already – the first only one day after the churchyard’s consecration. Probably the parish priest himself envisioned a division of the burial grounds: one slope for the common people of the suburb of the rapidly expanding industrial Ghent, and another one for the local

Nataliya G. Novichenkova

creation after WW II of an Archaeological Department of the Museum has led to a 5-fold increase in the size of its collection. This now includes finds from late classical and early medieval burial grounds (Aj-Todor, Alushta, Druzhnoe, Verkhynaya Oreandal, the Gothic necropolis near Goluboj Zaliv, and the

Kathryn O'Sullivan

previous chapter The administration of burial grounds and cemeteries in Ireland is devolved to local authorities. The powers and duties of local authorities in relation to these sites are derived from the Public Health (Ireland) Act, 1878 (Part III) (as amended by the Local Government (Sanitary

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Joel David Robinson

Forgetting - the art of forgetting - is no longer seen as the simple opposite of remembering, but has been increasingly validated in modernity, as that which is intrinsically a part of memory. This essay will question the degree to which European memorial spaces (specifically burial grounds, cemeteries or graves) of the late modern period have exemplified a more self-reflexive approach to forgetting. It will explore how the funerary projects of twentieth-century architects have manipulated or mediated the landscape in such a way as to incite reflection on the dialectic of memory and forgetting. What is peculiar to these projects is that they reject the traditional aspirations to timelessness, permanence and monumentality in funerary architecture. Instead, they would seem to ground the space of memory in an experience of the changeable landscape and the ruinous work of time and the elements. To the extent that an analogy is being drawn here between forgetting and those processes that erode architecture’s imprint on the landscape over time, this essay will inquire into the significance of forgetting for memorial landscapes today, and argue that such landscapes can be perceived as Lethean sites (Lethe being, of course, the river of forgetfulness in Greek mythology).