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the first ten editions of Grotius’s seminal De iure belli ac pacis ( ibp ). The ambition is to publish the resulting census bibliography in 2025, the 400th anniversary of ibp ’s first publication, under the (provisional) title, The Unseen History of International Law: A Census Bibliography of Hugo

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In: Grotiana

. While a great deal has been written about the iconic role of ibp , a census bibliography that locates and examines every surviving copy, documents and analyses readers’ annotations, and traces the copies’ dissemination and movement over time, has never been carried out. This approach to the material

In: Grotiana

Abstract

The first edition of Hugo Grotius’s De iure belli ac pacis was published in Paris by Nicolas Buon in 1625. An unauthorised second edition appeared in Frankfurt a year later, from the reputable Wechel press. After Grotius made hundreds of changes to the first and second states of the first edition, and failed to convince the publisher Nicolas Buon of the merits of printing yet another edition of the book, the Wechels’s release of a new edition sought to capitalise on the high demand for the text, as copies had sold out in Central Europe by the summer of 1625. In this preliminary report on the 1626 edition, using online and card catalogues, we have located 59 surviving copies. We examined thirteen copies in person, and another three fully digitised copies online, and on the basis of this small sample we have been able to draw a number of conclusions. We hope that this research note on preliminary results will generate interest in this unduly neglected edition, and that readers will kindly bring further copies to our attention.

In: Grotiana

Abstract

Hugo Grotius’s best-known work, De iure belli ac pacis, appeared in 1625 in Paris with the author’s approval. A second unauthorised version was published in 1626 in Frankfurt. In 1631 the Amsterdam publisher, Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571–1638), issued the third edition, this one authorised by the author – and this edition featured nearly a thousand revisions by Grotius. The purpose of this report is to analyse the context behind the publication of this third edition and the copies’ provenance records. Using online and card catalogues, we have located 154 copies. We examined 52 copies in person, and another three fully digitised copies online. We hope that this research note on preliminary results will generate greater interest in this unduly neglected edition, and that readers will kindly bring further copies to our attention.

In: Grotiana

History of International Law: A Census Bibliography of Hugo Grotius’s De iure belli ac pacis  173 Mark Somos Bibliography  181

In: Grotiana
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Onomas- ticon, no. 513). Bibliography: Onomasticon, n. 513. Site 81: Khirbet en-Neby Yarub (B) This place is identified with Beit Yarub of the 1596 Ottoman census. Bibliography: Hütteroth and Ab- dulfatah 1977, 129. Site 88: Meseliyeh The finds do not support the old identification with Bethuliyah

In: The Manasseh Hill Country Survey, Volume I: The Shechem Syncline
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’s Unfinished Grotius Business, Grotius’s Novel Turn to Ancient Law, and the Genealogical Fallacy’, Grotiana 38 (2017), 211–228, at p. 223. 32 M. Somos, ‘The Unseen History of International Law: A Census Bibliography of Hugo Grotius’s De iure belli ac pacis ’, Grotiana 40 (2019), 173–179, at p. 177

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In: Grotiana

: Empire and Legal Networks (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017); Arnulf Becker Lorca, Mestizo International Law: A Global Intellectual History 1842–1933 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015). 9 On the census see Mark Somos, ‘The Unseen History of International Law: A Census Bibliography of

In: Grotiana

Moran, ‘Legal Studies after the Cultural Turn: A Case Study of Judicial Research’, in Sasha Roseneil and Stephen Frosh (eds.), Social Studies after the Cultural Turn (London: Palgrave, 2012), pp. 124–143; Mark Somos, ‘The Unseen History of International Law: A Census Bibliography of Hugo Grotius’s De

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In: Print and Power in Early Modern Europe (1500–1800)