The Role of the Hague Conventions
On 13th September, 1997, a symposium was held in honour of Adair Dyer at the Peace Palace in The Hague. This symposium, entitled `Globalization of Child Law: The Role of the Hague Conventions', was organized by the Faculty of Law of Tilburg University and the International Society of Family Law in collaboration with the Hague Conference on Private International Law. Adair Dyer, best known for his exceptional work in the area of international child abduction, was active at the Hague Conference for more than 25 years.
The protection of children has been a major concern of the Hague Conference from the very beginning of its existence. The Conference followed and reacted to developments such as the increasing numbers of children - alone or accompanied - moving or migrating internationally, which has given rise to many new legal, economic, social and cultural problems. During the symposium, the past, present and future roles of the Hague Conventions in the international protection of children, taking into account the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, were examined and discussed. This volume contains the contributions to this international symposium, as well as the full texts, in both English and French, of the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of Child Abduction, the 1993 Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption, and the 1996 Hague Convention on Jurisdiction, Applicable Law, Recognition, Enforcement and Co-operation in Respect of Parental Responsibility and Measures for the Protection of Children.
This series of studies on child law and children’s rights seeks to provide timely and high-quality analyses of all issues relating to the interface of children and adolescents with their surrounding societies. The focus is on legal research results, but multi-disciplinary child-right-related studies also have an obvious place in the series. The diversity of contributions will be maintained by including scholarly works by academics and scholars from all geographical areas.

independent; it is not allowed to foster one child unless authorised to do so by the Social Affairs Directorate”. 3 This term was replaced by Term 4 in the Egyptian Child Law No. 12 of 1996 (Article 87): 4 The prospective foster family should not have more than two children, unless both are self

In: Arab Law Quarterly

of the child, a multitude of legal acts relating to the protection of the family life of children have been passed by the Swedish legislator. The legal activity further points to the fact that the right to family life has a bearing on virtually all areas of child law – given the child’s need for care

In: Children’s Constitutional Rights in the Nordic Countries
Authors: Paul Clarke and Keith Walker

In this chapter we share our beginning journey to better understand the notion of best interests of the child from two perspectives: a social science perspective and a jurisprudential perspective. First, to explore the best interests of the child from a social science viewpoint, an electronic Delphi survey approach was used with leading/executive human services professionals (from health, social services, education, and justice) and state-level public policy makers to ascertain their extant notions of the best interest of the child and related issues. Just over 80 intersectorial experts (by position), whose work directly or indirectly (policy or administration) related to children and their families, provided their viewpoints. Second, this chapter describes our exploration of the best interests of the child concept from a jurisprudential angle. This involves a consideration of the special nature of children’s rights along with a brief analysis of two important Supreme Court of Canada decisions where the focus is on best interests of the child.

In: Children and Childhood: Practices and Perspectives
A Quarter of a Century of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
Child-friendly Justice assesses how the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child has affected the development of child law and the promotion of children’s rights in the past twenty-five years. Its 24 studies probe a broad variety of issues relating to children’ s contact with civil, administrative and criminal justice systems, the protection of child integrity and their right to participation, information and proper representation.

The contributors - all experts on child-related matters - represent international organisations, academia and NGOs. They provide a clear picture of the origins of the current problems in realising child-friendly justice, and they discuss possible solutions.

doubt that these reforms have had a significant impact on family and kinship structures. 2 Until recently, however, child law (i.e., rules addressing the parent-child relationship such as custody [ ḥaḍāna ] and guardianship [ wilāya ]) largely remained outside the focus of legislative reforms. At the

In: Hawwa

Abstract

This monograph examines the issue of feminicide, more specifically female infanticide, in the family context, and the extent to which it is addressed under international law. For this purpose, it explores the phenomenon of feminicide, the origins of son preference and ‘daughter devaluation’ and the myriad factors that underpin female infanticide. Legal semiotics is employed to assess whether the provisions of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR 1966), the main international treaty enshrining the right to life, sufficiently tackle female infanticide. Throughout its analysis, this monograph examines several factors that constitute obstacles to the protection of girl children in the family context, as well as relevant legislation and case law. Amendments to the ICCPR are proposed to clarify States parties’ duty of due diligence and ensure that the crime of female infanticide is effectively prohibited, investigated, and prosecuted.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Family Law in a Global Society
Taking Stock after 25 Years and Looking Ahead
In 2014 the world’s most widely ratified human rights treaty, one specifically for children, reached the milestone of its twenty-fifth anniversary. The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child was adopted after the fall of the Berlin Wall, and in the time since then it has entered a new century, reshaping laws, policies, institutions and practices across the globe, along with fundamental conceptions of who children are, their rights and entitlements, and society’s duties and obligations to them.
Yet despite its rapid entry into force worldwide, there are concerns that the Convention remains a high-level paper treaty without the traction on the ground needed to address ever-continuing violations of children’s rights. This book, based on papers from the conference ‘25 Years CRC’ held by the Department of Child Law at Leiden University, draws together a rich collection of research and insight by academics, practitioners, NGOs and other specialists to reflect on the lessons of the past 25 years, take stock of how international rights find their way into children’s lives at the local level, and explore the frontiers of children’s rights for the 25 years ahead.


Abstract

This monograph examines the issue of feminicide, more specifically female infanticide, in the family context, and the extent to which it is addressed under international law. For this purpose, it explores the phenomenon of feminicide, the origins of son preference and ‘daughter devaluation’ and the myriad factors that underpin female infanticide. Legal semiotics is employed to assess whether the provisions of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR 1966), the main international treaty enshrining the right to life, sufficiently tackle female infanticide. Throughout its analysis, this monograph examines several factors that constitute obstacles to the protection of girl children in the family context, as well as relevant legislation and case law. Amendments to the ICCPR are proposed to clarify States parties’ duty of due diligence and ensure that the crime of female infanticide is effectively prohibited, investigated, and prosecuted.

In: Feminicides of Girl Children in the Family Context