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Author: Monica Tempian

World War refugee children. The experiences of child refugees in New Zealand reveal that in a world involving vast distances, group dynamics, language communities and chain solidarities were core values on which refugees crucially depended. A socio-culturally oriented biographical method that ties in

In: Refugees from Nazi-occupied Europe in British Overseas Territories

forced migration reality in many ways, not the least of which is that receiving countries consider child refugees more desirable than adults. That which is pre-cultural and vulnerably empty presents no threat but is rather an invitation to influence. Studies of representations of refugees in Canadian

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

” form—that is, as pre-social humanity’. 17 Innocence is linked to vulnerability because innocence is an ‘empty trait’. 18 Figuring the child as a blank, pre-cultural slate impacts forced migration reality in many ways, not the least of which is that receiving countries consider child refugees more

In: Children and the Responsibility to Protect
In: Exile in and from Czechoslovakia during the 1930s and 1940s
Editor: Julia Hall
Winner! 2013 Critics Choice Award from the American Educational Studies Association (AESA)
The United States tends to portray itself as a human rights leader. However, human rights concerns are confronted everyday by people in this democracy, including children. The purpose of this volume is to bring attention to the fact that against the backdrop of neoliberal expansion, serious human rights violations are taking place among children everywhere, including in the US.
The daily struggles among groups of school children in the US are specifically considered here, such as children who are sorted by race, homeless children, transient children, child refugees, children as targeted by human traffickers, and/or child migrant workers. As the economy continues to constrict, more and more young people find themselves struggling to grow up on these razor thin margins of survival. Given current economic arrangements, such margins are widening.
The definition of “children’s human rights” as understood in this analysis is taken directly from the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child [CRC]. Here emphasis is placed on ways in which the CRC could be used to serve more effectively the needs of the most vulnerable populations of school-age children in the US and elsewhere. Public schools could be the very place where children come to understand they have rights. Unfortunately, many children do not get this information. Instead the protections stated in the CRC and the realities of the lives of so many children are often worlds apart. This volume sets out to be a part of changing this.
Author: Andrea Hammel

Abstract

This contribution examines the role of gender regarding memoirs by former Kinder­transpor­tees and other child refugees who fled to the UK. It will discuss the different experiences of male and female Kinder­transpor­tees and the different ways male and female authors represent these experiences, and the issue of memoirs as social history sources as well as literary narratives. Embedding the discussion in wider debates on Holocaust Studies and memory literature by refugees and exiles, it will give examples of gendered memory narratives from a number of Kindertransport memoirs.


In: Exile and Gender I
10 Years of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, passed in 1989, was the first universal treaty dedicated solely to the promotion and protection of the interests of children. In its first decade the Convention achieved near-universal ratification and is now the most widely ratified human rights treaty ever. In addition, as a consequence of its influence, children's human rights have been mainstreamed and are now prioritised at all levels within the United Nations and other regional organisations. This book provides the first comprehensive overview of the first decade of the Convention. It also brings together leading scholars and activists who place the Convention in a wider context and revisit contemporary debates and controversies in children's rights to assess the extent to which these issues have been influenced by the Convention in its first decade.
The purpose of this collection is to provide, in an easily accessible form, documents on children which have either a regional or a global significance. Both private international law and public international law treaties are included together with recommendations and resolutions adopted by global, regional and intergovernmental organisations. For ease of reference the documents are organised according to subject headings and within each subject grouping or sub-subject grouping the documents are arranged according to both the chronological order and the adopting organisation. In addition, selected child provisions from global and regional human rights instruments are included. This second edition includes a number of important documents which have been concluded since the publication of the first edition. This unique collection constitutes an important tool for all those working in the field of children's rights, and is a valuable companion to Geraldine van Bueren's The International Law on the Rights of the Child (Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1993, ISBN 0-7923-2687-3).
This volume focuses on a previously under-researched area, namely exile in and from Czechoslovakia in the years prior to the Second World War as well as during the wartime and post-war periods. The study considers, firstly, the refugees from Germany and Austria who fled to Czechoslovakia during the 1930s; secondly, the refugees from Czechoslovakia, both German and Czech-speaking, who arrived in Britain in or around 1938 as refugees from Fascism; and thirdly, those who fled from Communism in 1948. From a variety of perspectives, the book examines the refugees’ activities and achievements in a range of fields, both on a collective and an individual basis. The volume will be of interest to scholars and students of twentieth century history, politics and cultural studies as well as those involved in Central European Studies and Exile Studies. It will also appeal to a general readership with an interest in Britain and Europe in the 1930s and 1940s.
In Children and the Responsibility to Protect, Bina D’Costa and Luke Glanville bring together more than a dozen academics and practitioners from around the world to examine the intersections of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) principle and the theory and practice of child protection. Contributors consider themes including how the agency and vulnerability of children is represented and how their voices are heard in discussions of R2P and child protection, and the merits of drawing together the R2P and Children and Armed Conflict (CAAC) agendas, as well as case studies of children’s lives in conflict zones, child soldiers, and children born of conflict-related sexual violence.

This collection of essays was first published in the journal Global Responsibility to Protect (vol.10/1-2, 2018) as a special issue.

Contributors are: J. Marshall Beier, Letícia Carvalho, Bina D’Costa, Myriam Denov, Luke Glanville, Michelle Godwin, Erin Goheen Glanville, Cecilia Jacob, Dustin Johnson, Atim Angela Lakor, Katrina Lee-Koo, Ryoko Nakano, Jochen Prantl, Jeremy Shusterman, Hannah Sparwasser Soroka, Timea Spitka, Jana Tabak, Shelly Whitman.