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Author: Luke Glanville

period, Boko Haram forced at least 135 children to act as suicide bombers. 5 r 2 p and Children and Armed Conflict Readers of this journal will know well that states unanimously acknowledged their responsibility to protect populations from atrocity crimes at the un World Summit in 2005

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Cecilia Jacob

response to crises, and are important for strengthening international protection regimes for children. To date, the focus of the international protection regime for children has centred on children and armed conflict ( caac ) – and in particular on the issue of child soldiering. While an important thematic

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Cecilia Jacob

crises, and are important for strengthening international protection regimes for children. To date, the focus of the international protection regime for children has centred on children and armed conflict ( caac ) – and in particular on the issue of child soldiering. While an important thematic focus

In: Children and the Responsibility to Protect

The first comprehensive and systematic analysis of the impact of armed conflict on children has been submitted to the UN General Assembly in 1996. The UN has since adopted and implemented a large number of initiatives and resolutions, making up the basis for the enhancement of monitoring and accountability of all parties responsible for violations perpetrated against children. The efforts to quantify and monitor violations against children committed not only by States, but also by Armed Non-State Actors, are an important milestone in the attempt to improve the protection of children. Nonetheless, the current UN architecture on children and armed conflict presents a number of shortcomings, in particular the lack of effective enforcement mechanisms, which hinder its capability to increase the achievement of more concrete results. After presenting an overview of the UN architecture on children and armed conflict, lingering on its constitutive elements as well as on its current weaknesses, this article will question if and to what extent the imposition of sanctions against individuals and entities can enhance the comprehensive strategy to thwart the harmful impact of armed conflict on children and the long lasting consequences it has on durable peace, security, and development. Furthermore, the present article will identify possible ways forward to improve the current framework, by discussing, inter alia, how the wealth of information gathered through the UN Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism could be used to feed into a more integrated information platform within the UN and also to strengthen accountability in international criminal tribunals.

In: The Italian Yearbook of International Law Online

102 OSCE Human Dimension Seminar on Children and Armed Conflict, 23-26 May 2000, Warsaw, Rapporteurs' Report Editors' note: The Human Dimension Seminar on Children and Armed Conflict was held in Warsaw on 23 - 26 May 2000. Below is printed the introduction and the rapporteurs' report of the

In: Helsinki Monitor

between sexual violence as a tactic of war and the concept of ‘threat to the peace’ in relation to the ‘Women and Peace and Security’ debates. 4 Although not commented upon by the Repertoire of Practice of the Security Council , the contemporaneous debates relating to ‘Children and Armed Conflict’ also

In: Children and Youth in Armed Conflict (2 vols.)
In: Children and Youth in Armed Conflict (2 vols.)
In: Children and the Responsibility to Protect