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, ‘children on the move’ 5 – especially when these children are unaccompanied and unprotected – pose a challenge to our 6 future. This is so because we associate the biological immaturity of children with the lack of a series of properties and capacities that are still to be developed. Children

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

, becoming easy prey for human trafficking and many forms of abuse and exploitation. 4 More than any other present problem, ‘children on the move’ 5 – especially when these children are unaccompanied and unprotected – pose a challenge to our 6 future. This is so because we associate the biological

In: Children and the Responsibility to Protect
How to Implement Their Right to Family Life
Increasing numbers of children are on the move throughout the world: moving or migrating, alone or accompanied. This gives rise to many new problems with legal, economic, social and cultural aspects, calling for new approaches based on a world-wide perspective. The international mobility of children poses a special challenge for the protection of their family environment, as guaranteed by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other international instruments.
Children on the Move contains the texts and speeches given and the papers presented at the international conference of the same title, which took place at the Hague, the Netherlands, 23-26 October 1994. The conference was one of the major contributions of the Netherlands to the UN International Year of the Family and was convened by the Netherlands Committee for the International Year of the Family in collaboration with the Hague Conference on Private International Law.
Children on the Move provides the reader with an in-depth analysis of the various legal aspects (problems and remedies) of inter-country adoption, international child abduction, and children as international refugees.
In Children and the Responsibility to Protect, Bina D’Costa and Luke Glanville bring together more than a dozen academics and practitioners from around the world to examine the intersections of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) principle and the theory and practice of child protection. Contributors consider themes including how the agency and vulnerability of children is represented and how their voices are heard in discussions of R2P and child protection, and the merits of drawing together the R2P and Children and Armed Conflict (CAAC) agendas, as well as case studies of children’s lives in conflict zones, child soldiers, and children born of conflict-related sexual violence.

This collection of essays was first published in the journal Global Responsibility to Protect (vol.10/1-2, 2018) as a special issue.

Contributors are: J. Marshall Beier, Letícia Carvalho, Bina D’Costa, Myriam Denov, Luke Glanville, Michelle Godwin, Erin Goheen Glanville, Cecilia Jacob, Dustin Johnson, Atim Angela Lakor, Katrina Lee-Koo, Ryoko Nakano, Jochen Prantl, Jeremy Shusterman, Hannah Sparwasser Soroka, Timea Spitka, Jana Tabak, Shelly Whitman.

Representing Children Responsibility to Protect the Future: Children on the Move and the Politics of Becoming  121 Jana Tabak and Letícia Carvalho R2P and the Novel: The Trope of the Abandoned Refugee Child in Stella Leventoyannis Harvey’s The Brink of Freedom  145

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Samantha Arnold

education. In Chapter 2 , Michelle Pace outlines the EU response to the increase in the number of children on the move. She then discusses the impact of the EU-Turkey statement from March 2016, one aspect of which refers to the ‘readmission of irregular migrants to Turkey’ from Greece, on refugee children

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights

achieving fair border control and humanitarian protection for children on the move regarding violence, case management, registration, family tracing and reunification, and support and education (European Commission, 2016a; European Commission, 2016b). The protection of unaccompanied minors is also a

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
Author: S.E. Rap

( enoc Taskforce children on the move, 2016 ; Cederborg, 2015 ; Crock, 2015 ; Lansdown, 2010 ). Children, in particular, experience a serious lack of information before and during their journey to the host country, regarding the journey itself, the authorities, procedures and access to rights and

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
Author: Bina D’Costa

consideration’. In addition, Article 2 (non-discrimination), Article 6 (the right to life and survival and development), and Article 12 (the right to be heard) are extremely important in the context of children on the move. Finally, crc General Comments, the authoritative guidance to states issued by the

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Bhabha

, Natural Disasters and Refugee Movements (New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988) [hereafter Ressler et al., Unaccompanied Children]. See also (ed.), J. Doek, H. van Loon and P. Vlaardingerbroek, Children on the Move: How to Implement their right to Family life (The Hague, Boston, London: Martinus

In: European Journal of Migration and Law