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Hadas Yeverechyahu

1 Introduction: co-occurrence restrictions in Hebrew In Semitic languages, homorganic consonants, i.e. consonants that share their place of articulation, tend not to co-occur within the same stem (Greenberg 1950). This includes hypothetical verbs like datam and kaɡam with homorganic C 1 and C

Berent, Iris

others are rare. These systematic regularities are expressed by co-occurrence restrictions—descriptive statements that potentially correspond to grammatical mental constraints. Two major restrictions on...

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Bernard Bachra

This book contains an investigation of the co-occurrence between the consonants in the triliteral and quadriliteral verbal roots of Arabic and Hebrew. The consonants are grouped on the basis of Manner or of Place. Both co-occurrence restrictions and co-occurrence preferences of consonants and of consonant groups are described in detail. The statistical test for pronomial proportions is used in order to determine the statistical significance of the results. These results are compared to those of earlier work by other authors on this subject. The findings are explained within the framework of generative phonology. The methods used are described in detail and the book contains a wealth of tabulated material which can be of great use to other investigators.

Jairo Guerrero Parrado

coronal stops and fricatives are particularly subject to co-occurrence constraints. 47 Returning to the object of our study, it is well known that affricate /ǧ/ and fricative /ž/ are subject to specific co-occurrence restrictions in Maghrebi Arabic. Thus, most dialects tend to avoid somehow the co

A Parametric Model for Syntactic Studies of a Textual Corpus

Demonstrated on the Hebrew of Deuteronomy 1-30

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de Regt

This book deals with Biblical Hebrew. Although it also relates to Old Testament interpretation, it is largely linguistic in character and is intended for linguists as well as scholars of Hebrew and Old testament. It discusses syntactic phenomena and correlations in the entire textual corpus of Deuteronomy 1-30 and is intended to contribute to a better insight into the Biblical Hebrew verbal system.
A wide variety of grammatical variables, referred to as parameters [e.g. verb form, subject, objects, adjuncts, conjunctions, word order, clause content, clause type], and their categories are examined. In the clauses of Deuteronomy 1-30, co-occurrences and co-occurrence restrictions of categories of different parameters are found.
It is taken for granted that the choice of the verb in a clause is influenced by characteristics of preceding and following clauses, especially the verb forms found in them. In order partly to account for these phenomena, connections have been made between clauses and their verb forms. This result in a consecutio temporum, the sequence of verb forms in a text.
Not only qualitative aspects of parameters and their categories are important, but also their quantitative proportions in Deuteronomy 1-30. Patterns are deduced from the frequencies of parameter categories and of their relationships.
The frequency tables are grouped together in the supplement separate to the book. In some tables, the categories of each parameter are listed with their freqencies and percentages. The other tables show the joint distribution of two parameters and their catagories.

Series:

Christian Mair

Abstract

This paper takes as its theoretical framework an approach to corpus-aided discovery learning in which the central role of corpora is seen as that of providing rich sources of autonomous learning activities of a serendipitous kind. Here the suggestion is put forward that availability of different corpora and software tools and the ability to combine these in different ways depending on the purpose of the activity may help learners develop an understanding of the patterned quality of activity may help learners develop an understanding of the patterned quality of language (probability, strength of co-occurrence restrictions, levels of contextual appropriateness), and be conducive to more appropriate use, as learners are guided not just to observe patterns, but also to develop hypotheses as to their variability. A learning experience is described, in which learners are introduced to a number of corpus tools (larger and smaller, general and specific, monolingual and bilingual corpora; two different software programmes for corpus analysis), and guided to progress from more convergent activities to autonomous browsing. Positive and negative sides of the approach are discussed, also in the light of learners' comments, and suggestions for improving the methodology and the tools currently available to learners are put forward.

Series:

Silvia Bernardini

Abstract

This paper takes as its theoretical framework an approach to corpus-aided discovery learning in which the central role of corpora is seen as that of providing rich sources of autonomous learning activities of a serendipitous kind. Here the suggestion is put forward that availability of different corpora and software tools and the ability to combine these in different ways depending on the purpose of the activity may help learners develop an understanding of the patterned quality of language (probability, strength of co-occurrence restrictions, levels of contextual appropriateness), and be conducive to more appropriate use, as learners are guided not just to observe patterns, but also to develop hypotheses as to their variability. A learning experience is described, in which learners are introduced to a number of corpus tools (larger and smaller, general and specific, monolingual and bilingual corpora; two different software programmes for corpus analysis), and guided to progress from more convergent activities to autonomous browsing. Positive and negative sides of the approach are discussed, also in the light of learners' comments, and suggestions for improving the methodology and the tools currently available to learners are put forward.