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Siu Han Chan

discourse, though unfortunately uncivil, usually intensify the esprit de corps of the idea of a nation, which would be especially instrumental for the prolonged struggles for political decolonisation and national autonomy of (post-)colonial societies. It is, hence, no surprise that colonialism and

Piotr Indykiewicz, Patrycja Podlaszczuk and Piotr Minias

frequent interactions with individuals other than social mates and provide abundant possibilities for extra-pair copulations (Morton et al., 1990 ). Consistently with this mechanism, it was suggested that colonial species are likely to show higher EPP rate when compared with solitary breeding species

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Edited by Anila Zainub

Decolonization and Anti-colonial Praxis presents research on contemporary forms of decolonization and anti-colonialism in practice. It pertains to the ways in which individuals, groups, and communities engage with the logic of epistemic colonial power within areas of citizenship, migration, education, Indigeneity, language, land struggle, and social work. The contributions in this edited volume empirically document the conceptual and bodily engagement of racialized and violated individuals and communities as they use anti-colonial principles to disrupt criminalizing institutional discourses and policies within various global imperial contexts.

The terms ‘Decolonization’ and ‘Anti-colonialism’ are used in diverse and interdisciplinary academic perspectives. They are researched upon and elaborated in necessary ways in the theoretical literature, however, it is rare to see these principles employed in applied forms. Decolonization and Anti-colonial Praxis provides a much needed contemporary and representative reclamation of these concepts from the standpoint of racialized communities. It explores the frameworks and methods rooted in their indigeneity, cultural history and memories to imagine a new future. The research findings and methodological tools presented in this book will be of interdisciplinary interest to teachers, graduate students and researchers.

Contributors are: Harriet Akanmori, Ayah Al Oballi, Sevgi Arslan, Jacqueline Benn-John, Lucy El-Sherif, Danielle Freitas, Pablo Isla Monsalve, Dionisio Nyaga, Hoda Samater, Rose Ann Torres, Umar Umangay, and Anila Zainub. 

Alejandro A. Vallega

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156916411X580959 Research in Phenomenology 41 (2011) 206–227 brill.nl/rp R e s e a r c h i n P h e n o m e n o l o g y Displacements—Beyond the Coloniality of Images Alejandro A. Vallega University of Oregon Abstract Dynamic mental images are co

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Joseph Drexler-Dreis

This essay develops a response to the historical situation of the North Atlantic world in general and the United States in particular through theological reflection. It offers an overview of some decolonial perspectives with which theologians can engage, and argues for a general perspective for a decolonial theology as a possible response to modern/colonial structures and relations of power, particularly in the United States. Decolonial theory holds together a set of critical perspectives that seek the end of the modern/colonial world-system and not merely a democratization of its benefits. A decolonial theology, Joseph Drexler-Dreis argues, critiques how the confinement of knowledge to European traditions has closed possibilities for understanding historical encounters with divinity, and thus possibilities of critical reflection. A decolonial theology reflects critically on a historical situation in light of faith in a divine reality, the understanding of which is liberated from the monopoly of modern/colonial ways of knowing, in order to catalyze social transformation.

Joseph Drexler-Dreis

European perspective, at the center of the world spatially, politically, and economically. The invasion established colonial relations of power that continue to shape the five-hundred-year history of Western modernity. Decolonial theorists use the term “coloniality” to refer to these power relations and to

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Joseph Drexler-Dreis

European perspective, at the center of the world spatially, politically, and economically. The invasion established colonial relations of power that continue to shape the five-hundred-year history of Western modernity. Decolonial theorists use the term “coloniality” to refer to these power relations and to

Donald V. Kingsbury

to lock) the region into a semi-colonial status precluding a ‘bourgeois-democratic’ prelude to proletarian revolution. As Mariátegui forcefully put it, ‘in Peru, there is not, and there never has been, a progressive bourgeoisie with a national sensibility that declares itself liberal and democratic

Colonial Taiwan

Negotiating Identities and Modernity through Literature

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Pei-yin Lin

This book offers a thorough and thought-provoking study on the impact of Japanese colonialism on Taiwan’s literary production from the 1920s to 1945. It redresses the previous nationalist and Japan-centric interpretations of works from Taiwan’s Japanese period, and eschews a colonizer/colonized dichotomy. Through a highly sensitive textual analysis and contextual reading, this chronologically structured book paints a multi-layered picture of colonial Taiwan’s literature, particularly its multi-styled articulations of identities and diverse visions of modernity. By engaging critically with current scholarship, Lin has written with great sentiment the most complete history of the colonial Taiwanese literary development in English.

Coloniality

Key Dimensions and Critical Implications

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Noah De Lissovoy and Raúl Olmo Fregoso Bailón

Emerging from sociological and philosophical inquiry into the history of the colonial encounter in Latin America, the notion of coloniality (and the larger field of decolonial theory with which it is now associated) has become a crucial theoretical resource for scholars across a range of