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Susan Allen Nan

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/138234008X297995 International Negotiation 13 (2008) 111–131 www.brill.nl/iner Conflict Resolution in a Network Society Susan Allen Nan* George Mason University, 3401 Fairfax Drive, MS4D3, Arlington, VA 22201 (E-mail: snan@gmu.edu) Received 17

Law, Territory and Conflict Resolution

Law as a Problem and Law as a Solution

Series:

Edited by Matteo Nicolini, Francesco Palermo and Enrico Milano

Prompted by the de facto secession of Crimea in early 2014, Law, Territory and Conflict Resolution explores the role of law in territorial disputes, and therefore sheds light on the legal ‘realities’ in territorial conflicts. Seventeen scholars with backgrounds in comparative constitutional law and international law critically reflect on the well-established assumption that law is ‘part of the solution’ in territorial conflicts and ask whether the law cannot equally be ‘part of the problem’. The volume examines theory, practice, legislation and jurisprudence from various case studies, thus offering further insights on the following complex issue: can law act as an effective instrument for the governance of territorial disputes and conflicts?

Kingsley M. De Silva

Conflict resolution in South Asia* KINGSLEY M. DE SILVA University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka and International Centre for Ethnic Studies, Kandy and Colombo, Sri Lanka (Received 19 March 1993; accepted 29 September 1993) Key words: conflict, ethnicity, nationalism, refugees, religion, separatism

Susan Allen Nan and Andrea Strimling

, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding 1 SUSAN ALLEN NAN* Assistant Professor, Director of Certificate Programs, Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University, 3401 Fairfax Drive, MS 4D3, Arlington, VA 22201 USA (Email: snan@gmu.edu) ANDREA STRIMLING** 160 Packard Avenue, Medford

Lior Lehrs

order to promote a conflict resolution process. Although the history of international and ethnic conflicts reveals many cases of ppe s, some of whom played a valuable or even critical role in conflict resolution efforts, the literature has not examined this important phenomenon with the full and

Fisher

International Negotiation 2: 331–351, 1997. 331 c 1997 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. Training as Interactive Conflict Resolution: Characteristics and Challenges RONALD J. FISHER Department of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada, S7N 5A5 Abstract

Rothman

International Negotiation 2: 451–470, 1997. 451 c 1997 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. Action Evaluation and Conflict Resolution Training: Theory, Method and Case Study JAY ROTHMAN McGregor School, Antioch University, 800 Livermore Street, Yellow Springs, OH 45387, USA

Herbert Kelman

International Behavior: A Social-Psychological Analysis (1965) and Crimes of Obedience: Toward a Social Psychology of Authority and Responsibility (with V. Lee Hamilton, 1989). The Role of an International Facilitating Service for Conflict Resolution HERBERT C. KELMAN* Weatherhead Center for International

Conflict Resolution Clinic (Stanford Law School), Global Justice Clinic (NYU Law School) and International Human Rights

Bibliographic entry in Chapter 26: The Multipolar Era: Clinton, George W. Bush, and Obama | Government, Think Tank, and NGO Documents authorInternational Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic (Stanford Law School) and Global Justice Clinic (NYU Law School

Abu-Nimer

International Negotiation 3: 99–116, 1998. © 1998 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. 99 Conflict Resolution Training in the Middle East: Lessons to be Learned MOHAMMED ABU-NIMER Peace and Conflict Resolution Program, School of International Service, American University