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condition of conventional meaning ( significatio ) is stated again in (1): A spoken term signifies something only if it is imposed to signify something such that the spoken term is subordinated to a mental term. It becomes clear that the relation of subordination does not (necessarily) obtain between the

In: Vivarium

C T Non-conventional meanings associated with some forms used in a class of anthroponyms (Yorùbá personal-names, henceforth Y P N s) can only be understood in the context of a metaphoric system. This claim is based on the fact that the corpus involved is wholly mono-morphemic and thus belong

In: Matatu

in a certain way, showing that these EP pronominal forms display a unique bundle of meanings. 6 Conclusion Descriptive pronouns in EP show a combination of conventional meaning components that to my knowledge has not been previously described. They contribute three meaning components: the

In: Secondary Content

forms display a unique bundle of meanings. 6 Conclusion Descriptive pronouns in EP show a combination of conventional meaning components that to my knowledge has not been previously described. They contribute three meaning components: the referential meaning

In: Secondary Content
Author: Bert Bultinck
Outlandish as it may seem to the uninitiated, the meaning of English cardinal numbers has been the object of many heated and fascinating debates. Notwithstanding the numerous important objections that have been formulated in the last three decades, the (neo-)Gricean, scalar account is still the standard semantic description of numerals.
In this book, Bultinck writes the history of this implicature-driven approach and demonstrates that it suffers from methodological insecurity and postulates highly non-conventional meanings of numerals as their "literal meaning", while it confuses the level of lexical semantics with that of utterances and cannot deal with a large number of counter-examples. Relying on the results of an extensive corpus-based analysis, an alternative account of the meaning of English cardinals and the ways in which their interpretation is influenced by other linguistic elements is presented. As such, this analysis constitutes a prism that offers todays linguist an iridescent history of one of the most fascinating, if often misconstrued, topics in contemporary meaning research: the conversational implicatures.
Understanding Films as Communicative Actions
'See What I Mean' reintroduces the question of language-likeness to film theory: On the one hand, films are unlike natural languages. They don’t have arbitrary, concrete, conventional meaning-segments corresponding to the words of a natural language. Filmic images are non-naturally and naturally meaningful; they can indicate states of affairs, but they can also have speaker-intended meaning. On the other hand, films and natural languages are alike - both are used for communicative purposes. Films as a special class of moving images are intentional visual artifacts with the main goal of communication. This volume contributes to the theoretical foundations of film philosophy. It answers questions concerning the relation of films and truth, films and intentionality, films and reality; it evaluates different ideas of film realism and discursive film theories, and it asks what the meaning of films is and how we understand films. Drawing on H.P. Grice’s model of communication and G. Meggle’s critical revisions of this model, B.S. Kobow argues that films are (communicative) actions in the world. With films we maintain, shape and negotiate social reality as J.R. Searle constructs it.