Search Results

Editors: Wendy Green and Craig Whitsed
Universities around the world have embraced internationalisation at the policy level, but struggle to put that policy into practice, particularly at the coalface of teaching and learning. To date, faculty voices have been largely silent in the literature on internationalising the curriculum. This book begins to address this gap.
What does ‘internationalisation of the curriculum’ (IoC) mean in practice? How is it conceived, implemented and assessed within specific disciplines, locales and types of institutions? Why does it matter? These questions are addressed in this book by academics teaching in the fields of business, education and health, in a range of institutions across North America, the Middle East, Europe, East Asia and Australia.
Reflecting critically on personal experience, through a scholarly engagement with current research, each chapter offers new ways of thinking about internationalising curricula in an increasingly interconnected world. The editors’ commentaries draw out the tensions between personal, disciplinary and institutional motivations, imperatives, and interests—in other words, tensions between the ideal and the do-able—which come into play in the practice of internationalising the curriculum, and offer insightful suggestions for future research and practice.
Critical Perspectives on Internationalising the Curriculum in Disciplines: Reflective Narrative Accounts from Business, Education and Health is essential reading for academics and administrators invested in exploring new ways to better prepare students for life and work in the 21st century.
Editor: Pierre Wilhelm
Rather than accept society’s ‘preferred metaphors’ about beauty at face value, the authors in this volume question the fact that beauty can also surprise us in the least foreseeable setting, at the most unexpected moment and in the most surprising or unsettling ways. Their work underscores beauty’s ephemeral, transitory, fleeting and at times confounding nature. The way beauty reveals itself to us, they point out, may challenge or even contradict established conventions, norms and values about aesthetics. The emergence of unconventional metaphors and analogies about beauty in these chapters calls on us to pay attention to competing and seemingly intractable connotations of fear, darkness, ugliness, oppression, repression, callousness and dejection that won’t leave us indifferent to their appeal. How we, as researchers, envisage beauty as a topic of investigation tells us as much about our conceptualization of beauty arising from particular scientific perceptions as about the language and symbols that express this perception. It raises the important question about why we rely on conceptual constructs to explain beauty and whether beauty remains a mystery to be explored or, ultimately, one best left unexplained.
No Country for Migrants? Critical Perspectives on Asylum, Immigration, and Integration in Germany aims to critically contribute to ongoing debates about immigration, integration, and xenophobia in Germany. Set against the backdrop of Germany’s controversial political decision to open its borders to refugees in 2015, the book realigns this watershed with the broader historical narratives of migration to explain its exceptionality both as an event and transformative force on the migration/integration discourse. The book further uses critical theories to make sense of the shifting socio-political coordinates of Germany. It addresses the history of Germany’s migration policies, its soft and hard power in migration control, language and societal integration, immigration and the revival of right-wing extremism, as well as religion and immigration.
Editor: Patricia Leavy
The Teaching Gender series publishes monographs, anthologies and reference books that deal centrally with gender and/or sexuality. The books are intended to be used in undergraduate and graduate classes across the disciplines. The series aims to promote social justice with an emphasis on feminist, multicultural and critical perspectives.

Please email queries to the series editor at pleavy7@aol.com.
Editor: Linda Ware
Critical Leaders and the Foundation of Disability Studies in Education aims to formalize the significance of early histories of understanding disability drawn from the scholarship of those who turned away from conventional status quo and pathologized constructs commonly accepted worldwide to explain disability in schools and society. The series begins with recognition of North American scholars including: Ellen Brantlinger, Lous Heshusius, Steve Taylor, Doug Biklen, and Thomas M. Skrtic. We will expand the series to include scholars from several international countries who likewise formed analyses that shaped the terrain for the emergence of critical perspectives that have endured and slowly given rise to the interdisciplinary field of Disability Studies in Education.
In rapidly globalizing spaces of life, any research project on international education would necessarily have multi-directional emphases, with the quality of observations and analyses reflecting the expanding political, economic and cultural intersections which characterize this potentially promising century. To respond to these emerging learning and living contexts of our world, this book brings together some of the most active and established scholars in the field. As such, the book represents important epistemic interventions that analyze and critique the institutional, socio-economic, linguistic and pedagogical platforms of international education. As the locus of international education cannot be detached from the pragmatics of social development, the specific recommendations embedded in this book expand the debates and broaden the boundaries of learning projects that should enhance the lives of people, especially those who are continually marginalized by the regimes of globalization. Thus, the book actively advocates for possibilities of human well-beings via different formats of education in diverse locations of life.