danger that generated significant fear among the people was that of curses. Pliny the Elder, for example, writes that defigi quidem diris precationibus nemo non metuit (“There is no one who does not fear to be spellbound by curses”). 2 Because of the general fear of curses in the ancient world, curses

In: Novum Testamentum

As with so many other Pentateuchal traditions interpreted in the sectarian literature of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the covenant curse form of Deut 27 was adapted to the needs of the Yahad movement. * However, the revision of this tradition within a singular movement does not necessitate that all

In: Dead Sea Discoveries

curses, but I would like to express my gratitude especially to Noureddine, Nadia Otmani, Melanie Clouser, Yasmin Amin, Dr. Youness El-Bousty, Dr. Allal Hajjam, Dr. Sam Cherribi, and Dr. Mohammed El-Ferran for their valuable contributions to this study. Yḥarrem ʿīštek w-īṭēyyer dšīštek “Qu’Il rende

In: Arabica

promote ǧihād propaganda on their behalf. 2 Among the ways in which al-Sulamī expresses his hostility to the Franks is the use of a suffixed invocation of God’s curse on them, ahlakahum Allāh (may God make them perish); 3 however, this form of invocation failed to be adopted by later writers, who

In: Arabica

[German Version] Blessing and Cursing...

In: Religion Past and Present Online

scribal and literary conventions used in Mesopotamian, Hittite and Israelite texts to describe oath-curses and bloodguilt reveals a growing tendency to depict divine retribution as a mechanical or auto- matic process. In addition to the importance of this study for the anthropological study of religion

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions

Q175 will be further shown through aspects of blessing and cursing as well as a recurrent theme of standing and falling which is manifest in each of the four sections. After identifying the context and primary meaning of these allusions to scripture, it will be shown that 4Q175 21–30 as a whole can

In: Dead Sea Discoveries

According to the definition of curse (German Fluch) in Zedler's Universal-Lexicon, a curse is “a speech by which we wish someone ill” [1. 1337]. In fact, to wish well (Latin benedicere) and to wish ill (Latin maledicere) are linked. Both rely on belief in the power of the word, particularly when

Some scholars have contended that in ancient Israel ‘curse’ (ʾālâ) was conceived of as a kind of demonic force that could invade the land or take over a person’s being. Although curse could on occasion be personified, there is little evidence from the Bible that curse was thought to be a self

Some scholars have contended that in ancient Israel ‘curse’ (ʾālâ) was conceived of as a kind of demonic force that could invade the land or take over a person’s being. Although curse could on occasion be personified, there is little evidence from the Bible that curse was thought to be a self