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Orly Lewis and Pavel Gregoric

in Galen, we find evidence of these debates in the treatise De spiritu attributed to Aristotle. In fact, De spiritu appears to be our sole surviving first-hand evidence of these debates, and as such it is an important source of our knowledge of early Hellenistic medicine which merits close

Pavel Gregoric, Orly Lewis and Martin Kuhar

The aim of this paper is to depict the anatomical and physiological doctrines of the treatise entitled Περὶ πνεύματος, or De spiritu. By closely examining the contents of the treatise on its own accord, rather than through its Aristotelian or Hellenistic contexts, we attempt to overcome the aporetic and often disconnected style of the author, and to present a coherent picture of his doctrine of pneuma, its roles in the body, the anatomical structures in which it acts, and its relation to the soul. We argue that the author envisions three main systems in the body: artēriai, by which external air is taken in, turned into pneuma and distributed to different parts of the body; phlebes, by which blood is produced and distributed; bones and neura, which support the body and effect locomotion. Pneuma is shown to run through the system of artēriai, whereby it performs vital activities such as thermoregulation, digestion and pulsation. It is also engaged in activities such as perception and locomotion, in the form of the “connate pneuma,”which, we propose, is a component of bodily parts. The author connects pneuma very closely with soul, and although he is familiar with Aristotle’s doctrine of the soul, he does not see to embrace it.


Mario Vegetti

(pp. 251–368). Sui ­presupposti aristotelici ed ellenistici del finalismo galenico è fondamentale il saggio di H. Von Staden, Teleology and Mechanism: Aristotelian Biology and Early Hellenistic Medicine , in W. Kullmann, S. Fölliger (a cura di), Aristotelische Biologie , Steiner Verlag, Stuttgart

Jaap Mansfeld

. The emphasis clearly is on Presocratic, Classical, and Early Hellenistic medicine. Furthermore, Diels' hypothesis of a strict Arbeitsteilung between Theophrastus (the philosophers) and Meno (the doctors) is incompatible with his further hypothesis that part I of Anon. Lond. derives from Meno, for as

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Jessica Wright

specific form of explaining phenomena by reference to ends considered as good or beautiful.” For Aristotelian teleology, see Heinrich von Staden, “Teleology and Mechanism: Aristotelian Biology and Early Hellenistic Medicine,” in Aristotelische Biologie , ed. Wolfgang Kullmann and Sabine Föllinger

Sylvia Berryman

Alexandria,Õ 85-106 in John Walsh and Thomas F. Reese (eds), Alexandria and Alexandrianism (Malibu 1996). —— . ÔTeleology and Mechanism: Aristotelian Biology and Early Hellenistic Medicine,Õ 183-208 in Wolfgang Kullmann and Sabine Fšllinger (eds), Aristotelische Biologie: Intentionen, Methoden, Ergebnisse

David Leith

. ‘Teleology and Mechanism: Aristotelian Biology and Early Hellenistic Medicine’ Aristotelische Biologie: Intentionen, Methoden, Ergebnisse 1997 Stuttgart 183 208 1 On its later history, see e.g. Forrester 1994 . 6 As Frede 2011 , 128 , observes, there is something wrong with

David Leith

175 193 von Staden H. Kullmann W. Föllinger S. ‘Teleology and Mechanism: Aristotelian Biology and Early Hellenistic Medicine,’ Aristotelische Biologie: Intentionen, Methoden, Ergebnisse 1997 Stuttgart 183 208 Switalski B. W. Des Chalcidius

Devin Henry

), Collected Works of A.M. Turing: Morphogenesis . Saunders, P.T. (ed.), New York: North-Holland. von Staden, Heinrich (1997), “Teleology and Mechanism: Aristotelian Biology and Early Hellenistic Medicine” in Kullmann and Föllinger (eds.) (1997), 183-208. Phronesis 151_1-42 1/25/05 4:39 PM Page 42