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Editor-in-Chief: Andrew Colin Gow
The Encyclopedia of Early Modern History — to be published in 15 volumes — offers 400 years of early modern history in one work. Experts from all over the world have joined in a presentation of the scholarship on the great era between the mid-15th to the mid-19th centuries. The perspective is European. That does not mean, however, that the view on the rest of the world is blocked. On the contrary: the multifaceted interrelatedness of European and other cultures is scrutinized extensively.

Also available online, the Encyclopedia of Early Modern History addresses major historical questions:
- which ideas, inventions, and events changed people’s lives?
- in which ways did living conditions change?
- how do political, social, and economic developments interlock?
- which major cultural currents have begun to become apparent?
- how did historical interpretation of certain phenomena change?

The individual articles are connected to one another as in a web of red threads. The reader who follows the threads will keep coming upon new and unexpected contexts and links.

This is an English translation of the well-known German-language Enzyklopädie der Neuzeit, published by Metzler Verlag.
Volumes 1-7 have been published in 2016-2019. The upcoming volumes are:
Volume 8: Lauda - Migratory labor
Volume 9: Military - Occultism
Volume 10: Occupation - Politica Christiana
Volume 11: Political journal - Religion, critique of
Volume 12: Religion, history of - Settlers' report
Volume 13: Seven Years' War - Symbol
Volume 14: Symphony - Uomo universale
Volume 15: Urban administration- Zunft revolution, Concluding chapters
Contacts, Comparisons, Contrasts. Early Modernity Viewed from a World-Historical Perspective
The early modern period of world history (ca. 1300-1800) was marked by a rapidly increasing level of global interaction. Between the aftermath of Mongol conquest in the East and the onset of industrialization in the West, a framework was established for new kinds of contacts and collective self-definition across an unprecedented range of human and physical geographies. The Journal of Early Modern History (JEMH), the official journal of the University of Minnesota Center for Premodern Studies, is the first scholarly journal dedicated to the study of early modernity from this world-historical perspective, whether through explicitly comparative studies, or by the grouping of studies around a given thematic, chronological, or geographic frame.

JEMH invites submissions both of individual articles and of proposals for special editions (which may appear up to twice a year). For more information, consult the online Instructions for Authors, or contact the journal at jemh@umn.edu. If you have books for review, please contact the Book Review Editor at jemh.rvw@gmail.com.