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Ecological Pneumatology In Akan anthropology, human beings are regarded as a composition of okra (the soul or bearer of destiny), sunsum (spirit or personality), ntoro (fatherhood) and mogya (blood). 8 According to traditional Akan anthropology all human beings receive okra and sunsum from the

In: Journal of Reformed Theology
Author: Sigurd Bergmann

Spirit’s inhabitation . The third concluding section will offer a longer argument for an ecological pneumatology in synergy with animism , an approach which investigates the critical potentials of resisting and overcoming the fetishism of late modern capitalism. Spirits are not seen as enemies but as

In: Journal of Reformed Theology
Author: Ewen Butler

are included along with contextual interpretations such as feminist, political, and ecological pneumatologies. The themes represented here are not considered to be entirely new creations as much as new confijigurations of Spirit theology for new contexts. A more comprehensive sampling of sources of

In: Pneuma

breath, living water, cleansing fire and the earth’s fruit bearer / divine dove (pp. 36–39, also 53f ). While such themes are also present in other contemporary ecological pneumatologies, Wallace also offers a moving account of the ‘wounded Spirit’ (p. 121f ): ‘Jesus suffers on the cross the sins of the

In: Religion and Theology

. The first example is process pneumatology, which attempts to understand the Spirit in dynamic and mystical terms. Then comes liberation pneumatology which developed in the womb o f the poor in Latin America and finds the Spirit in contexts o f survival. Also, there is ecological pneumatology, which ad

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

Catherine Keller (2007). 10 To this list one may add contributions by reformed theologians where ecological concerns are present if perhaps not foregrounded, e.g. the proto-ecological pneumatology of Hendrikus Berkhof, 11 the famous essays on pneumatology by Arnold van Ruler (1989), 12 Bram van de Beek

In: Journal of Reformed Theology

assumptions by figuring the Spirit, in the economies of confronting violence and healing the earth, as a living embodied being who works for healthy communities within our shared planet home.” 14 Taking up the biblical picture of the Spirit as a liberating and empowering force he writes: “An ecological

In: Journal of Reformed Theology

. 30. Moltmann, Spirit of Life, p. 8. See however my article ’The Renewal of Harvest: A Charismatic Theology of Creation’, Anglicans for Renewal 49 (Summer 1992). This represents a first attempt at an ecological pneumatology. I am also working on a biblical sociology of culture which addresses

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology
Author: Jeffrey S. Lamp

and activity, indicating that the whole of creation has value apart from human habitation and that it, along with human beings, will experience salvation when it is transformed into the new heavens and new earth. 28 I similarly argue that such an “ecological pneumatology” is implicit within the

In: Pneuma
Author: Matthew Eaton

concept while for the most part accepting the idea as it is laid out in these earlier essays. Other uses of deep incarnation are found in Elizabeth Johnson’s (2009, 2010) ethics, Mark Wallace’s (2000, 2005) ecological pneumatology, Denis Edwards’ (2006) discussion of biosystemic functionality, Christopher

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology