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rules and principles underlying global economic order remains a dynamic and non-linear process with an open outcome. The above discussion suggests three take-home points that are relevant for conceptualising norm diffusion: 1. Any analytical framework on global norm diffusion must capture the

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

discussion suggests three take-home points that are relevant for conceptualising norm diffusion: 1. Any analytical framework on global norm diffusion must capture the dynamic and non-linear nature of the process. 2. Norm diffusion is a continuing process with ongoing feedback . 3. The traction and

In: Children and the Responsibility to Protect

. She is the author of Beyond the Western Liberal Order: Yanaihara Tadao and Empire as Society (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), and published articles on global norm diffusion, East Asian politics, and Japanese perspectives of international relations. She received her Doctor of Philosophy in International

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

University Press, 2009). 3 Amitav Acharya, ‘Norm Subsidiarity and Regional Orders: Sovereignty, Regionalism, and Rule-Making in the Third World’, International Studies Quarterly , 55: 95–123 (2011). 4 Jochen Prantl and Ryoko Nakano, ‘Global Norm Diffusion in East Asia: How China and Japan

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

Pacific review 19/2: 157–79 (2006); David Capie, ‘Localization as resistance: The contested diffusion of small arms norms in Southeast Asia’ (eng), Security dialogue 39/6: 637–58 (2008). 23 J. Prantl and R. Nakano, ‘Global Norm Diffusion in East Asia: How China and Japan Implement the

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

, Iraq and Libya’, Contemporary Politics , doi: 10.1080/13569775.2015.1014178 (2015), p. 6. 25 Amitav Acharya, ‘The R2P and Norm Diffusion: Towards a Framework of Norm Circulation’, Global Responsibility to Protect , 5/1: 466–479 (2013). 26 Joachim Prantl and Ryoko Nakano, ‘Global norm

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

–196 (2011); J. Prantl, and R. Nakano, ‘Global Norm Diffusion in East Asia: How China and Japan implement the Responsibility to Protect’ International Relations 25/2: 204–223. (2011); Cristina Badescu and Thomas Weiss, ‘Misrepresenting R2P and Advancing Norms: An Alternative Spiral?’ International Studies

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Kate Seaman

, Jochen, and Ryoko Nakano. “Global Norm Diffusion in East Asia: How China and Japan Implement the Responsibility to Protect.” International Relations 25 (2) (2011), 204–233. https://doi.org/10.1177/0047117811404450 . Rosenau, James N. Turbulence in World Politics: A Theory of Change and Continuity

In: Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations

Ryoko Nakano, “Global Norm Diffusion in East Asia: How China and Japan Implement the Responsibility to Protect,” International Relations 25 (2011): 204–223; Nicola P. Contessi, “Multilateralism, Intervention and Norm Contestation: China’s Stance on Darfur in the un Security Council,” Security

In: Global Governance, Conflict and China

), 10. China was also the first country outside Africa that sent troops to the hybrid mission. See Jochen Prantl and Ryoko Nakan, “Global Norm Diffusion in East Asia: How China and Japan Implement the Responsibility to Protect,” International Relations 25 (2011): 214. 212 James Meernik, “Justice

In: Global Governance, Conflict and China