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Globalisation

A Systematic Marxian Account

Tony Smith

Part One of this book examines the social-state, neoliberal, catalytic-state, and democratic-cosmopolitan models of globalisation. Each necessarily tends to function in a manner contradicting essential claims made by its leading advocates. This “immanent contradiction” provides a theoretical warrant for moving to a new position, addressing the shortcomings of the previous framework. The first three chapters of Part Two are devoted to a Marxian model of capitalist globalisation, in which the irresolvable contradictions and social antagonisms of the capitalist global order are explicitly recognised. The final chapter is devoted to a Marxian model of socialist globalisation, in which those contradictions and antagonisms are overcome, bringing the systematic dialectic of globalisation to a close.
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Jonathan Verschuuren

I am writing this contribution while attending a conference for environmental law professors from around the world in Baltimore, entitled ‘Global Environmental Law at a Crossroad’. 1 While this fact does not deliver a whole lot of empirical proof, it is at least an indication that the ‘global

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Elham Fallah Manshadi and Afrooz Fallah Manshadi

International Conference, Keynote Address Rejkjavik, Iceland O’Brien D. “Moderated Influence: Globalisation and Thai Housing” Na Jua—Journal of the Faculty of Architecture 2002 18 59 75 Silpakorn University Short J. Kim Y. “Globalization and the

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Risshō Kōseikai within Globalization

A Multidimensional Approach

Ugo Dessì

Introduction The increasing number of studies focusing on the interplay between globalization and culture indicates that religions are positively involved in global dynamics, and that the globalization of religion extends far beyond worldwide proselytizing. From this broader

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Danyang Xie and Kun Cheng

countries and regions, each having their own characteristics, were at different stages of development, but there were common reasons for why they maintained high-speed growth. The most important one was that they maintained an openness for globalization. However, since 2016, a series of events—Brexit, the

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Fang Cai

yu zhengzhi 世界经济与政治 ( World Economics and Politics ) 2016.11, 4–24. 1 Joseph E. Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Co., 2003); Stiglitz, “Globalization and Its New Discontents,” http://www.straitstimes.com/opinion/globalisation

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Nusta Carranza Ko

The literature on globalization presents scholars with various positions on its effects on the political, economic, and social dimensions of states. Much of the literature on globalization can be organized into two competing camps: The ones who regard globalization in a positive light and the

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Bei Jin

Today, the world economy is at a crossroads: due to the slow economic recovery, countries are looking for strategies to cope with lackluster economic growth and straitened employment trends, and some have fallen into difficulty. On top of that, they are facing great challenges in global

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Situating Globality

African Agency in the Appropriation of Global Culture

Edited by Wim van Binsbergen and Rijk van Dijk

Situating Globality challenges the dominant view that globalization is a primary threat to African societies and economies. It explores how these societies are appropriating elements of the emerging global culture, arguing the significance of this appropriation in local struggles, the expression of critical thinking, ideologies and ritual styles of behaviour. Combining an interest for micro-level processes of situating the multifaceted process of globality with the exploration of reflexivity, creativity and the production of knowledge, Situating Globality straddles the divide between anthropological and philosophical representations of Africa in the new world order. The first section examines philosophical issues relating to the production of knowledge in and about Africa from a globalizing perspective, while the other sections include case studies showing how these processes are accommodated in everyday life.
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Yao Xinzhong

took for granted in the past. In other words, ethical traditions, either old or new, have changed in the process of modernization and in the context of globalization. What does it mean for ethical traditions to change along with modernization? To answer this question, we must examine what we mean by