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Katarzyna K. Starczewska

The author of the glosses that are the object of this article, Juan Gabriel of Teruel, converted to Christianity at the beginning of the sixteenth century, at a time and place where conversion of the Moriscos (Muslims converted to Christianity) was a highly charged issue. In some of the Iberian

Katarzyna K. Starczewska

The author of the glosses that are the object of this article, Juan Gabriel of Teruel, converted to Christianity at the beginning of the sixteenth century, at a time and place where conversion of the Moriscos (Muslims converted to Christianity) was a highly charged issue. In some of the Iberian

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Sinéad O'Sullivan

This book focuses on the glosses on Prudentius’ Psychomachia as found in the German or Weitz manuscript tradition. These glosses provide a fascinating window to the intellectual world of the late Carolingian and Ottonian periods. Introducing the reader to the rudiments of Christian exegesis and encyclopaedic information, they represent an important moment in the history of early medieval thought and instruction. In the book attention is redirected from the philological concerns of conventional glossing studies toward mainstream intellectual history. The first part examines the manuscripts, function and sources of the glosses. The second part provides an introduction to the edition, together with a diplomatic transcription of the Latin and German annotations in three Weitz manuscripts.

José Martínez Gázquez

not seem to hold everywhere to a suitable ordering when I discuss the contents of [this] very confused book.] 5 Doubtless, Cusa’s reading and reflection on the Qurʾān must have provided the foundation for his writings on Islamic doctrine. An important part of Cusa’s reflections were the glosses

Landau, Peter

[German Version] In the canonistics (Church law: IV, 1, 2.a) appended to the Decretum Gratiani ( Corpus Iuris Canonici ), explanatory glosses were already added to the text of the Decretum before 1150. The authors of the glosses can sometimes be identified by their sigla (Decretists). According to

Rohmer, Ernst

In Aristotle’s Poetics, “gloss” (Greek glōssa; Lat. glossa, verbum peregrinum, verbum gentilium; New Lat. glosa; French glose; Italian glossa) denoted an archaic or dialectal word used by a poet as literary embellishment. The Roman rhetorician Quintilian characterized a gloss as the type of word

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Seino van Breugel

There are some important differences between glossing here and in van Breugel 2014a. First, the progressive and durative interpretations of the morpheme ⟨ =aidonga ~ =aidong ~ =aidok ~ =aironga ~ =airong ~ =airok ~ =aronga ~ =arong ~ =arok ~ = edonga ~ =edong ~ =edok ~ =eronga ~ =erong ~ =erok

Nikolai Dobronravin

, various scribes could revise the text, adding marginal and interlinear glosses, correcting the errors of the original manuscript, etc. It is often forgotten that no such revisions in print are possible for technical reasons. Moreover, whatever the quality of manuscripts brought to the press, very few

Walid A. Saleh

a coherent explanation as to why al-Kashshāf became so popular among Sunni scholars. Indeed, al-Kashshāf became the main textbooks used for teaching tafsīr in the madrasa system and one of the most glossed text in the genre of tafsīr . This was despite the fact that it was a Muʿtazilite

Asad Q. Ahmed

genre of commentaries and glosses allowed for the process and growth of philosophical discourse. As has been acknowledged for some time, in the post-classical period, a rather massive body of the Muslim scholarly output fell within the scope of the commentary/gloss genre. Much maligned in western