evaluation of desirable communities. In the earlier paper, it was shown why Dewey, in the 1930 statement, rejected the view of growth presented in Democracy and Education , but it did not address the question of his reconstructed view of the nature of growth. What are adequate reconstructions of

In: Contemporary Pragmatism

In a neoclassical growth framework with a typical political-economy mechanism, this paper reexamines the relationship between the income inequality and economic growth by introducing government spending into the production function and the utility function. It demonstrates that Kuznets’ famous inverted-U shape relationship between inequality and economic growth will hold—the growth rate will be first increasing with the income inequality before the growth rate decreases with inequality.

In: Frontiers of Economics in China

everyday citizens is perhaps most apparent with respect to the notion of ‘economic growth’. The late economist Kenneth Boulding frequently noted that modern economists have been obsessed with ‘growth’: every conventional economic theory takes the promotion of ‘growth’ to be the goal of economic policy. One

In: Contemporary Pragmatism

We examine the contributions of the telecommunications infrastructure to economic growth in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies during the period from 1982 to 2003 using a modified version of the model developed by Roller and Waverman (2001). Our estimation results show that, consistent with Roller and Waverman (2001), telecommunication infrastructure has a significant effect on economic growth in the APEC region and that the inclusion of country fixed effects is important for obtaining a more reliable estimate of the growth effect. Moreover, the magnitude of the growth effect is inversely related to the level of telecommunications infrastructure in the APEC economies. While the marginal effect of an increase in telecommunications infrastructure in the APEC region is smaller than that in the OECD countries found in Roller and Waverman (2001), the total contribution of telecommunication infrastructure to economic growth is larger in the former than in the latter.

In: Frontiers of Economics in China

GROWTH OF PECTORAL MUSCLE FIBRES IN RELATION TO SOMATIC GROWTH IN SOME MARINE FISHES by RAHUL KUNDU and A. P. MANSURI (Laboratory of Fish Biology, Department of Biosciences, Saurashtra University, RAJKOT - 360 005, India) SUMMARY In the present communication, growth dynamics of pectoral muscle

In: Netherlands Journal of Zoology

Based on provincial panel data, we tested the effects of openness, denationalization, fiscal reform, and their interactions on Chinese regional economic growth. We found the following: (1) Openness, especially the growth of foreign-direct-investment/gross-domesticproduct ratio, has been important in enhancing China’s growth since the mid-1980s, while this effect is not so significant in western China. (2) Fiscal reform is another significant factor for economic growth. If local governments deregulate, higher growth will be obtained. In particular, reducing extrabudget expenditure helps push economic growth, especially in western China. (3) The interaction of economic policies, such as openness, denationalization, and fiscal reform, also plays an essential role in local economic growth. Both for the whole nation and for the eastern area, denationalization does not affect growth independently but expands the effects of deregulation. (4) After controlling economic policies and their interactions, conditional convergence exists. (5) With other factors controlled, eastern China achieved higher growth, while the middle and western areas did not differ significantly in growth. (6)Western China, where policy variables have lower explanatory power for growth, has a growth pattern different from those of the eastern and middle areas.

In: Frontiers of Economics in China

Growth is an important concept in Dewey’s philosophy, and, indeed, its ultimate focus. It is not, however, an easy task to posit growth as an ethical ideal, for here Dewey immediately faces a metaphysical dilemma: whether to offer us an objective standard of growth, which becomes a type of absolutism, or to inevitably fall into relativism. This paper explores how Dewey avoids this dilemma with his concept of experience, which is interrogated through the relationship between human beings and nature. Still, human growth in nature involves the cultivation of virtuosities (de 德) in accordance with the rhythm of nature, and requires a completely different way of life other than our technological one. For this reason, I use Chinese philosophy, specifically ideas from the Yijing, to show how growth can be illustrated through the interaction between humans and the natural world.

In: Frontiers of Philosophy in China