Series:

Shulamith Kreitler, Frida Barak, Yasmin Alkalay and Nava Siegelman-Danieli

The paper deals with survivor’s guilt. The purpose was to describe the phenomenon and to study some of its correlates, functions and consequences in the context of the caretakers of cancer patients. The first part presents a brief review of what is known about survivor’s guilt, focusing on its frequency, the circumstances in which it has been observed and explanations offered in the frameworks of the psychoanalytic, the social-evolutionary and existentialist approaches. The second part presents findings of an empirical study of survivor’s guilt by the authors. The participants were 113 caretakers of cancer patients, to whom questionnaires were administered 2-3 weeks before the patient’s death and 2-3 weeks following it. Interviews were conducted with 42 caretakers 6 months later. Survivor’s guilt was reported by 65.4% of the caretakers. The major results were that survivor’s guilt is distinct from the emotions of guilt and remorse, and that it is only moderately related to demographic, emotional, circumstantial and other variables characterising the relationship to the deceased. Interviews after 6 months showed that most of those with survivor’s guilt were engaged in voluntary pro-social activities and showed evidence of enhanced ‘contact’ with the deceased whose presence was maintained in their life space.

Majid Ghorbani and Yuan Liao

As the number of immigration and their later generations grow in the workforce of more developed Western countries, understanding the processes and consequences of acculturation has gained a new level of importance. An old and re-emerging issue is the morality and reparative behavior in Western versus Eastern cultures, as well as its antecedents and consequences. We examined the effects of acculturation on the perception of psychological proximity, the intensity of moral emotions of shame and guilt, and the degree of compensation to victims of one’s wrongdoing. Our sample was comprised of a collectivistic group from a shame culture, China, and an acculturated group of Chinese living in a much less collectivistic society of a guilt culture, Canada. Our results indicated that participants’ perception of psychological proximity to other people and the level of compensation offered to the victims of transgression were significantly different among the two samples. Furthermore, shame and guilt mediated the relationship between perceived psychological proximity and the decision to compensate differently.

Majid Ghorbani and Yuan Liao

As the number of immigration and their later generations grow in the workforce of more developed Western countries, understanding the processes and consequences of acculturation has gained a new level of importance. An old and re-emerging issue is the morality and reparative behavior in Western versus Eastern cultures, as well as its antecedents and consequences. We examined the effects of acculturation on the perception of psychological proximity, the intensity of moral emotions of shame and guilt, and the degree of compensation to victims of one’s wrongdoing. Our sample was comprised of a collectivistic group from a shame culture, China, and an acculturated group of Chinese living in a much less collectivistic society of a guilt culture, Canada. Our results indicated that participants’ perception of psychological proximity to other people and the level of compensation offered to the victims of transgression were significantly different among the two samples. Furthermore, shame and guilt mediated the relationship between perceived psychological proximity and the decision to compensate differently.

Marcia Heloisa

This chapter proposes a discussion on monstrosity and the economy of guilt in the 1960 movie Psycho, Alfred Hitchcock’s chef d'oeuvre, based on the homonymous novel by Robert Bloch. The film stands as a seminal work whose cultural and artistic relevance not only stood the test of time, but also seems to be constantly inviting revisions and re-imaginings. Among these, the 2013 television series Bates Motel stands out as a prequel that intends to offer the viewer an in-depth look into the original characters’ lives years before the events of Bloch's novel and its subsequent cinematic rendering. Psycho´s simple yet powerful plot introduces the reader/viewer to Norman Bates, a man who sees himself entrapped in a claustrophobic existence, haunted by the looming presence of his dominating mother, whose constant abuse deprived Norman, since his childhood, of any sense of self-confidence, social aptitude and filial autonomy. Often read as a work drenched in Jungian archetypes, Psycho can alternatively be seen as an archetype itself. Its subversive narrative, challenging our linear and nonsynchronous understanding of the mystery/horror genre plot evolution, lead to a paradigm shift that forever changed our perception of monstrosity. By presenting Norman as a regular all-American guy, Psycho redefined the monster as seemingly harmless and entirely human. The monster was no longer the Other, but ourselves – just as the fear of death became the fear of the mind. Psycho made us realize that worse than dying was living in a world where one could no longer discern the blurred lines that separate sanity from madness. Using Sigmund Freud's analysis of consciousness of guilt, social anxiety and the relocation of the parental authoritative voice to the super-ego, this chapter examines how the perpetrator can become the victim and investigates recent reappraisals of Norman as a tragic figure searching for individuation.

Dolichan Kollareth, Jose-Miguel Fernandez-Dols and James A. Russell

embarrassment (Rusch, 2004). The Russian term styd can be translated into English as shame, guilt , and embarrassment (Ogarkova, Soriano, & Lehr, 2012). One study identified 113 shame-related terms in Chinese (Li, Wang, & Fischer, 2004), with no evidence that any one is shame’s equivalent. Similarly

Donald Carveth

Abstract: Guilt entails the idea of a debt one is obliged to repay. Legal or metaphysical guilt and psychological or experiential guilt need not correspond. One can be guilty but not feel it; one can feel it, but not be it. Guilt may be conscious or unconscious. Two fundamentally different kinds of

Gräb-Schmidt, Elisabeth and Radtke, Henning

[German Version] I. Dogmatics – II. Ethics – III. Law Despite its central significance for the understanding of the human being, discussion about guilt in Christian theology at the present time has lost its importance. The criticism made by F. Nietzsche and S. Freud of the categorial function of

von Soosten, Joachim

1. The essential notes of the category of guilt are two. For one, ‘guilt’ evinces the person as the author of a delinquency to whom the consequences of his or her actions must be ascribed even beyond the concrete deed. For another, ‘guilt’ indicates the instances before which the person becomes

Bron, Bernhard

Guilt is to be understood in relation to the violation of a fixed norm or ideal, or to the failure to live up to it. It presupposes some authority that calls us to account, such as God, reason, nature, or human law (Rights, Human and Civil). In content it is hard to distinguish among criminal

Fabrice Teroni and Otto Bruun

referee of this journal for helpful comments on a previous version of this paper. Shame, Guilt and Morality * Fabrice Teroni Institut für Philosophie, Universität Bern Hochschulstrasse 4, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland Fabrice.Teroni@philo.unibe.ch Otto Bruun Département de Philosophie, Université de Genève 2